#1
Hey guys..I'm not an expert on resonance...
I work in a machine shop. I get to use scrap metal
to play with sometimes..So i had an idea..

If i was to take a 1/2 inch thick sheet of metal and
traced the body of a guitar on to it....cut it out...
and bolted it to the body of the guitar...

In theory...how would that affect the tone?
or would it not effect it at all...

Im guessing it would weigh...2 to 3 lbs..
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
#2
It would make it sound alot tinnier I think. And it may affect your pickups it being metal? What metal is it?
#4
it might have an affect on resonance a little... but it shouldn't affect the pickips. I dont think ti would mess with the magnentic field of yourn pickups that much, if at all... just cause something is metal doesn't mean that it can change a magnentic field...

which is how pickups work by the way
-------------------------------
Faded Gibson SG Special - Black ice mod
Seymour Duncan SH-5 in bridge
B-52 AT 112
Ted Weber Mass100 attenuator
EHX Small Clone
EHX Metal Muff
DIY Modded tubescreamer
Dunlop 535Q Wah
Wax Potting tutorial
#5
I was thinking it Would Be a Pretty 'Metal' guitar. :P
Metal!!!/COLOR]<br><br>
Gear:
LTD M-200FM
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50.
Ibanez SZ720FM
Boss MT-2 MetalZone
Boss GE-7
Zoom II Effects Pedal
#6
Not entirely sure, but I've heard that installing a bigsby (heavy piece of cr@p) does add some sustain. Can anyone confirm?
#8
I think it would depend on the material used, mainly the density. I read somewhere that denser materials resonate less, which reduces the parasitic loss from the string vibration. This causes the strings to vibrate longer, which increases sustain. Why not try it and let us know how it sounds?
#9
I don't know how much of an effect it would have without modifying the body. Any guitar that has a partial metal construction has usually been cut into a semi-hollowbody or semi-hollowbody-esk body. In order for it have a positive impact on the sustain of the guitar the metal would have to be thin enough to vibrate with the pluck of a string in order for it to be audible via pickup. There's a few different variations on this principle. Brass blocks are an awesome way to add a considerable amount of sustain to the sound of a guitar, as do brass or glass saddles, ivory or synthetic nuts, the fretwire, the material used for the fretboard (various woods, metal or glass) and of course the technique of the player.

My main concern is that a 1/2 inch piece of metal bolted onto the back of a guitar would have no effect (other than making it heavier), or actually hinder what resonance that existed before. Because of the increased weight and tension caused by the piece of metal (once again, without a modified body), wouldn't allow the wood to flex properly, thus less reverberation.

However, I can't find a reason why you shouldn't give it a shot if you've got the free materials and tools to experiment with. All I'd suggest is to buy a cheapo guitar to experiment on, just increase it goes really bad.

Those are my thoughts.
Enter something refreshingly witty here:
#10
Quote by fastfretjazz
I was thinking it Would Be a Pretty 'Metal' guitar. :P

oh lord. i knew that was coming haha
haha not a clue about the metal top really, 1/2" might make the thing REALLY heavy though
EPIPHONE LES PAUL
IBANEZ S SERIES CUSTOM
VOX AD30VT
#11
be better to go thinner and IF it does effect the magnetic field, if you can get it, Aluminium. look at Matt Bellamy's original and New Manson Delorean guitars.

Original Delorean:


New Delorean:
GEAR:
Epiphone LP special model 2 (Heavily modded - killswitch and custom midi X-Y touch pad).
Digitech Whammy, Zvex Fuzz Factory, Boss Dynamic Wah, Electro harmonix Little Big Muff, Zoom G7.1ut, Digitech Grunge, Korg KP2.
Marshall AVT 50x