#1
hey there.

so here's the deal:
my dad had an old wireless headphone, so I used it to make an wireless system for my guitar. I have everything working now. but the transmitter uses an 12V adapter, and it isn't very useful if I can play 50m away from the amp but I do have to plug the adapter in. anyone knows how I can make a 12V battery or something like that? like connecting 2 6V batteries?

Thanks, Farether
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#3
You could use a 9v battery perhaps. Or you could try one of those tiny 12v batteries they use in car keychain remotes.

They both probably wouldnt last long.
#4
Quote by Orethor
What current does the adaptor supply

the input is 230V and the output it 12V regulated and 200mA

edit: If I can find an 12V battery somewhere, how can I connect it to the transmitter?
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#5
Quote by Farether
the input is 230V and the output it 12V regulated and 200mA

edit: If I can find an 12V battery somewhere, how can I connect it to the transmitter?


My car uses a 12V battery:

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495A though.

#7
Quote by -MintSauce-
My car uses a 12V battery:

(Invalid img)

495A though.


XD, but I think it's a little bit big and heavy
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#8
Go to Radio Shack and find a small 12v battery pack with charger.

Read this:
http://www.bradlinder.net/2007/07/building-external-battery-pack-for.html

He uses that to power a Zoom H4 Handy Recorder.
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#9
you could use 2 9V batteries in series with a resistor. 200 to 300 ohm resistor would do the trick. It'd be the cheapest of all these solutions.
#10
Quote by -MintSauce-
My car uses a 12V battery:

(Invalid img)

495A though.



do that, carry it in a backpack, hell maybe throw a camelback system in there. great idea Mintsauce


but no, seriously, im liking the idea of two 9v's with resistors..maybe build it and put it in a little encloser that could attach to your strap, or just put the circuit inside the guitar. whatever you think, best of luck dude.

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#11
I saw you said 200mA and that'll drain a 9v really quick. Best bet is going to radioshack and find something that holds 8 AA batteries. that's 12 volts and it'll last forever whereas the 9 volts will last 20 -30 minutes with a 200 Ohm resistor
#12
8 AA batteries is a lot. a lot of weight. where can you store that in or on your guitar? or, just get a button cell 12 V.
Quote by Invader Jim
The questions people ask here makes me wonder how the TS's dress themselves in the morning and can shower without drowning...
#13
Quote by Farether
hey there.

so here's the deal:
my dad had an old wireless headphone, so I used it to make an wireless system for my guitar. I have everything working now. but the transmitter uses an 12V adapter, and it isn't very useful if I can play 50m away from the amp but I do have to plug the adapter in. anyone knows how I can make a 12V battery or something like that? like connecting 2 6V batteries?

Thanks, Farether
I think you may have a problem here. Transmitters for wireless guitar rigs are designed with the limitations of batteries in mind. Not so for this transmitter for the headphones. Before choosing a battery and using this on your guitar, you should put a 1 ohm resistor in series with the adapter. Then measure the voltage drop across the resistor when running the system. 1 mV = 1 mA. Or just use a ammeter in series to measure the current if you have one. Some of the smaller batteries suggested may not be suitable.
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#14
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
I think you may have a problem here. Transmitters for wireless guitar rigs are designed with the limitations of batteries in mind. Not so for this transmitter for the headphones. Before choosing a battery and using this on your guitar, you should put a 1 ohm resistor in series with the adapter. Then measure the voltage drop across the resistor when running the system. 1 mV = 1 mA. Or just use a ammeter in series to measure the current if you have one. Some of the smaller batteries suggested may not be suitable.


+1

But you can try 2 9 volts with a 200 ohm resistor. it's certainly be cheap enough to do and if it doesn't work try something else
#15
for the record, two 9 volt batteries don't give you 18 volts... its still 9 volts...

and I know theres a store in my home town called battery geeks or something, that make custom batteries and packs... i'm sure you could make a rechargeable one that can fit in your pocket or something...

just looked at some 12 volt battery packs and the ones I saw where kinda expernsive
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#16
^ Pretty sure you can wire batteries to give you either the same voltage but with increased current/battery life, or with cumulative voltage...
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#17
Quote by ICANSEEYOU7687
for the record, two 9 volt batteries don't give you 18 volts... its still 9 volts...

and I know theres a store in my home town called battery geeks or something, that make custom batteries and packs... i'm sure you could make a rechargeable one that can fit in your pocket or something...

just looked at some 12 volt battery packs and the ones I saw where kinda expernsive


Two 9V batteries in series -> 18V.
#18
Quote by -MintSauce-
Two 9V batteries in series -> 18V.


...and two 9V batteries in parallel -> 9V

whichever is best for your application
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#19
you'd want them in series to get 18V then after that you figure your drawing around 20 mA

EMF - V = Vnet V=IR I= 20mA? 6v = .02A x R R =300Ohms

18 - 6 = 12 which is total output. I said 200 so he'd get a bit better battery life and possibly extended range.

Oh and you can get 2 9V batteries to equal 18V. In parallel Voltage is constant and amperage adds. In series, Voltage adds and amperage is constant.
Last edited by ESP_Shreder at May 17, 2008,