#1
This is the original chord progression
E, G#maj, Amaj, B

i changed it to

-0------------------------------------------------------
-0------4-------5----4--3---------------------------------
-1------4-------6----4--4-------------------------------
-2------4-------7----4--4-----------------------------------
-2------6-------7----2--2------------------------------------
-0----------------------------------------------------------


do u think its a good improvement? Cause i find the first progression too rock..

What other chords i could change to make it more melodic? Thanks
#2
It's pretty different...
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID
#4
that is still be same chord progression, except the G#maj is now G#m7 or B/D#, depending on how you look at it and what note the bass is playing. also, that last chord is a Bm, which doesn't seem to fit, but keep it if it sounds good to you. chord progressions usually aren't that melodic, but the easiest way to make them so is to highlight some kind of half or whole step movement in one of the notes of each passing chord. that sounds a little awkward to say, but a good example is kansas' dust in the wind. it's like this:

--------------------------------0------------
-1-------1-----3-------3-----1-------1----
------0------0------0------0------2-----2-
----2------2------0------0------2-----2--- etc...
-3-----3-------2-----2-------0-----0------
----------------------------------------------

notice how the vocal line is also the top note of each chord. something like that always works. good luck!
#5
you can add some passing tones and suspensions and id make the chords into 9ths or 7ths or 6ths but if using a 7th the 7th of the chord has to resolve downward
#6
a good idea is try to make the top notes of the chord only a tone or semi-tone apart at each change, a minor third at most. If you do that the chords will flow better. And try adding random notes to some chords (or not so random notes if you know what your doing) but just try more interesting chords rather than changing the root note of the chords
#7
btw the technique of having the top notes of a chords being only a semi tone or tone away is called voice leading its used in jazz a lot and can help you look at inversions a look more and help you alter chords and find things you didnt think about so try that out
#8
So you have E, G#min7, A, B and Bminor?

I like both but i don't like the Bm at the end. If you wanted to change the B you could play:

B Badd6(i think)
---2----4---
---4----4---
---4----4---
---4----4---
---2----2---
---X----X---

Or if you meant melodic as is minor and sad then perhaps:

C#m (Relative minor of E), B (relative major of the G#minor in the second progression), F#m (relative of A) and E (because it sounds good).

I put the brackets in to explain how i got from your progression to this one because at first glance it seems totally seperate from the original one.
#9
Quote by oreodunk
This is the original chord progression
E, G#maj, Amaj, B

i changed it to

-0------------------------------------------------------
-0------4-------5----4--3---------------------------------
-1------4-------6----4--4-------------------------------
-2------4-------7----4--4-----------------------------------
-2------6-------7----2--2------------------------------------
-0----------------------------------------------------------


do u think its a good improvement? Cause i find the first progression too rock..

What other chords i could change to make it more melodic? Thanks



opps i didn't meant Bminor... i pressed on the 5th fret on the B string instead x.x
#10
the bass just follows the root note too
Last edited by oreodunk at May 16, 2008,
#11
Quote by 12345abcd3
So you have E, G#min7, A, B and Bminor?

I like both but i don't like the Bm at the end. If you wanted to change the B you could play:

B Badd6(i think)
---2----4---
---4----4---
---4----4---
---4----4---
---2----2---
---X----X---

Or if you meant melodic as is minor and sad then perhaps:

C#m (Relative minor of E), B (relative major of the G#minor in the second progression), F#m (relative of A) and E (because it sounds good).

I put the brackets in to explain how i got from your progression to this one because at first glance it seems totally seperate from the original one.



heya, i like it but would u mind explaining to me how do i relate them together? like C#m is a relative minor of E? Do you mind explaining? Thanks
#12
Quote by oreodunk
heya, i like it but would u mind explaining to me how do i relate them together? like C#m is a relative minor of E? Do you mind explaining? Thanks


Well, the E major scale goes:

E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#, E

and the C# natural minor scale goes:

C#, D#, E, F#, G#, A, B, C#

If you look closely you'll see that the both have the same notes. The minor scale that has the same notes as a major scale is called the major scale's relative minor and the major is the minor's relative major.

For example, Am is the relative minor of C major and C major is the relative major of A minor.

To work out the relative minor of a major you look at ,or think of, the major scale then go two notes back from the root notes. eg, the root note is C so 1 note back is B and 2 is A, the relative minor.

It's good the know the relative minors of common scales so you can use them straight away without having to think of the scales, however you don't have to know really rarely used majors' minors' (like G#major!) by heart.

12345abcd3

Ps, if you want to know more about relative minors and their uses you should probably read the theory sticky (or at least the bit about relative minors) because it will give you quicker and probably better information than i would.

However, feel free to PM me if there is something you don't understand.