#1
It's not limited to Metal but this is where I have heard it the most. The solos sound really full and sort of multi-dimensional it's kind of hard to describe. My solo's always sound so flat and ho-hum by comparison.

I believe it's a recording method because I don't hear this quality in live performances, so I don't think it has anything to do with you amp/effects etc? Perhaps I am wrong.
#3
maybe it has something to do with the acoustics of the room you record it. i honestly have no clue.
i'm a rhythmist, but when i do solo, i have 2 different distortion sounds 1) for the main rhythm, which usually has a heavy, chug-like distortion to it and 2) with minimal distortion, just enough to highlight harmonics and the such

hope it helped
#4
I don't think that's it mainly because this quality can be heard only on certain albums, it's not a commonly used technique.

If you want to hear exactly what I am talking about listen to some early In Flames and Opeth stuff, you can really hear it on there.

Again, I hear only a handful of bands do this and it always sounds the same, so I don't thing it's gear specific.
Last edited by ixelion at May 16, 2008,
#8
What part of the song are you talking about. There's some harmony riffs, some with lead tone with reverb and a tad of delay it sounds like. Can you be more specific please.

DS
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#10
using the neck pickup helps. gives a slurred liquidous sound thats associated with most shredding.

use a little more gain than you would if you were straight up riffing, small splash of 'verb or delay is nice too.

after listening to the clip, well thats not really a solo.. but getting that kinda sound would be from a bridge pickup, some gain and some good midrange.

don't scoop your mids.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
Last edited by Kivarenn82 at May 16, 2008,
#12
ur not talking bout the harmonies are u?


I think it is harmonies, do I need an octave pedal or a pitch shifter for that sound?

As I stated before you don't hear this sound on many albums, but once in a while I will hear it on some melodic death solos or lead melodies.

You can also hear it on some early Opeth albums but I cant remember a specific song at this very moment.
Last edited by ixelion at May 17, 2008,
#13
Quote by ixelion
I think it is harmonies, do I need an octave pedal or a pitch shifter for that sound?

As I stated before you don't hear this sound on many albums, but once in a while I will hear it on some melodic death solos or lead melodies.

You can also hear it on some early Opeth albums but I cant remember a specific song at this very moment.

Either that, or a second guitarist who plays one part of the harmony and you play the other. Or when you record, record yourself once and then the harmony over what you played.
#15
Ok so this is similar to double tracking? I was only doing that with rhythm stuff, but I will try it out with lead and see if I cant replicate that sound.

Also thanks for helping me identify this, it took a while but we got it :P
#16
It should also be noted a synth is doubling the R channel Lead at some points.