#1
ok, so i'm writing a song and have decided that i want a chord progression of Em, Am, and C major. i know weird but i like it. but for one of the solos, i was going to keep it to just the two minor chords/scales. what i was wondering is if it would be better to use the E natural minor and A natural minor scales and just combine them to write the solo or should i use different ones? it'll be kinda bluesy but mostly just my own style. i might add in a little bit of metal-ish type stuff but mostly a blues feel. thanks.

EDIT: if this should be in the songwriting forum I'll move it. just tell me.
#2
i think that would work. you could use E minor blues and A minor blues if you want that kind of bluesy feel, too.
#3
Quote by Guitar_Poet
i think that would work. you could use E minor blues and A minor blues if you want that kind of bluesy feel, too.

ok. thanks, i'll see how it works. maybe i'll write a solo in with each set of keys and then see which one i like better.
#4
Quote by ortrigger
ok, so i'm writing a song and have decided that i want a chord progression of Em, Am, and C major. i know weird but i like it. but for one of the solos, i was going to keep it to just the two minor chords/scales. what i was wondering is if it would be better to use the E natural minor and A natural minor scales and just combine them to write the solo or should i use different ones? it'll be kinda bluesy but mostly just my own style. i might add in a little bit of metal-ish type stuff but mostly a blues feel. thanks.

EDIT: if this should be in the songwriting forum I'll move it. just tell me.



If your just going back and forth between Em and Am where E is the tonal center....
your in E minor.

E natural minor scale
E minor pentatonic
E minor blues

Those are your best bet, although there are always other options.
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
If your just going back and forth between Em and Am where E is the tonal center....
your in E minor.

E natural minor scale
E minor pentatonic
E minor blues

Those are your best bet, although there are always other options.

no offense but i knew this stuff already. i was just wondering if it would be okay to add in elements from the A minor scale(s) or if it would make it sound weird. but thanks for the input.
#6
Quote by ortrigger
no offense but i knew this stuff already. i was just wondering if it would be okay to add in elements from the A minor scale(s) or if it would make it sound weird. but thanks for the input.



NP

well remember your going to hear it as it relates to the tonal center. If your in E minor, your in E minor. IMO A minor wouldnt work all that well, although alot of then notes will sound fine. Best thing to do is to try it out and hear for yourself.
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
NP

well remember your going to hear it as it relates to the tonal center. If your in E minor, your in E minor. IMO A minor wouldnt work all that well, although alot of then notes will sound fine. Best thing to do is to try it out and hear for yourself.

ya. ok thanks. i guess i could try using the relative major...
#8
Quote by ortrigger
ya. ok thanks. i guess i could try using the relative major...
Playing the notes E F# G A B C D over an Em progression is E minor, not G Major, B Phrygian, or C Lydian.

Your scale exists all over the neck, however.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Playing the notes E F# G A B C D over an Em progression is E minor, not G Major, B Phrygian, or C Lydian.

Your scale exists all over the neck, however.

i know this. i just need to figure out where exactly all the notes are. i'm still learning notes in relation to which fret and string. i wish it was as easy as trumpet.