#1
I've noticed that my guitar neck has a slight curve in it. Is this anything to do with the truss rod?
#2
Yeah, stick an allen key in it a twist it a couple times.
SCALD
Quote by Phill-Rock
That, or being absolutely broke - though you always find money for cigarettes, then end up even more broke.

so true ^.
_______________
Quote by k1ng_pooh
what in the name of satanus is a bass?

Quote by smb
I think it's a type of fish.


PM me for GP5
#4
yes, you should take off the truss rod cover plate, find a tool that matches the socket/hole/whatever and turn to clockwise three time full times, then one hour later turn it counterclockwise five full times. works every time.
Pretty please, with sugar on top, clean the f***ing car.
I love pulp...
Someone told me there's a girl out there
With love in her eyes and flowers in her hair...

I will find this girl.

#5
be careful you might mess it up even more id take it to guitar shop
Very Orange CARVIN DC 700
PRS SE Custom - crunch lab&PAF pro
Ibanez GRX40 - modified
Peavey Valveking 112 w/ 2x12 cab

Originally Posted by Shirate
The guitar, the only beautiful female that looks better with the top ON haha

Transformice
#6
What can cause this?

I recently went from slinky's to skinny top heavy bottom strings.

Is this a thing I'll have to do everytime I change strings now?
#8
I thought that the neck should be straight??

I presume that using thicker strings would affect this?
#10
Quote by rockinsk8r91
yes, you should take off the truss rod cover plate, find a tool that matches the socket/hole/whatever and turn to clockwise three time full times, then one hour later turn it counterclockwise five full times. works every time.

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO. NO! This could easily snap your neck!

Turn the truss rod 1/8th of a turn at MOST, let it sit an hour, then repeat. Do so until the neck is straight.

Changing gauges of strings could have caused your neck to bow. Depending on which way it is bending, you will have to turn the truss rod the correct way.
#11
Quote by ketiov
NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO. NO! This could easily snap your neck!

Turn the truss rod 1/8th of a turn at MOST, let it sit an hour, then repeat. Do so until the neck is straight.

Changing gauges of strings could have caused your neck to bow. Depending on which way it is bending, you will have to turn the truss rod the correct way.


Like if your looking down the neck you don't want it to bow?
#12
gah. most everyone should shut up.

thread starter, lower action at the bridge first.
make sure any trem bridges are level.

then if you still cant get low action without buzz then meassure the necks relief.

fret the low E at the first fret, at the same time,
fret the Low E at the last fret, where the neck and body meet.

with both places held, look at the middle frets. 7-9th frets.

if the string lays on the fretwire there, you dont have enough bend.
if the string is more than a credit cards thickness up from the wire there, you have too much bend.

measure and repost.

DONT just randomly crank the rod.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#13
^ The best way to measure the neck curvature is to fret the first and 17th fret on the low E string, and measure the distance between the string and the 12th fret. If it should be between 0.5 and 1 mm. If that's the case and you don't have fret buzz on the first 12 frets your neck is just fine.
If the action is still too high you should adjust the bridge height.
And indeed don't just start turning the truss rod, you could end up snapping your neck or the truss rod.
Don't turn it more than half a turn each time and let it rest for a few hours after such a turn. As a reminder: when the guitar is in front of you, headstock in your crotch, bridge far away, so you're looking down on the neck, turn right to tighten the truss rod (straighten the neck, brings the neck closer to the strings, increases fret buzz) and turn left to loosen the truss rod (increase the curvature, reduce fret buzz).
Hope this helps
Jackson KV 2, Jackson COW 7 (both in B), Jackson Demmelition V
Bogner Überschall (blue rev)
Marshall 1960B Vintage (2x V30 & 2x G12T75)
TC Electronic G Major
BBE Sonic Maximizer 422A
Weber Mass 150w
ISP ProRackG
T.Racks Dinopower
Last edited by Ventor at May 16, 2008,
#14
Quote by ketiov
NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO. NO! This could easily snap your neck!

I'm pretty sure he was attempting to be sarcastic, but failed in a dangerous way...
#15
ventor, i know you mean well, but trust me, you dont want to go too fast with the instructions on this.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#16
i have a simpler solution than you all...

take it to a professional. but seriously if you dont know what your doing you could really mess up the guitar that way.
#17
Quote by jj1565
ventor, i know you mean well, but trust me, you dont want to go too fast with the instructions on this.


Yes maybe half a turn is too much, I usually do quarter turns actually or as much as it lets me turn it in one time without bending strings with the allen wrench.
Jackson KV 2, Jackson COW 7 (both in B), Jackson Demmelition V
Bogner Überschall (blue rev)
Marshall 1960B Vintage (2x V30 & 2x G12T75)
TC Electronic G Major
BBE Sonic Maximizer 422A
Weber Mass 150w
ISP ProRackG
T.Racks Dinopower