#1
OK, so there are A chords, B chords, minors, etc, that's not an issue, but for example "7" in a D7 chord, or Am7, etc, what does the 7 mean? Obviously a D7 sounds different than a "D" chord, but... uh, hard to word the question. That's all it is? A different sound to the same note-chord, or is there something else to it?

Hopefully this makes enough sense for you to answer.

*edit* - D7sus4 is another example... Does sus mean "super ultra snazzy"?
Last edited by VvLOGiKvV at May 16, 2008,
#2
you add the 7th degree of a scale to the chord. So for D7, you'd have D (1st), F# (3rd), A (5th), and depending on if it's dominant (major chord with minor 7th) or a normal major chord (all natural), you would have a C or a D# respectively. I believe D7 would be dominant though, and if it were an actual major chord, it'd be written as Dmaj7. Not exactly sure on the notation, but the rest of it should be right.

As for the sus (suspended) chords, you replace the 3rd with a 4th or a 2nd. So with a sus4 chord, you'd have a 4th, and with a sus2 chord, a 2nd.
Last edited by JoshXXXXX at May 16, 2008,
#3
OK, most of that went over my head. No worries though, just means I've got a lot to learn.

Thanks though!
#4
Basically, it's a different chord thats all.

D Major - D F# G

D7 - D F# G A

Dm7(major 7) - D F# G B

You know a regular Major is just 3 notes, a seventh just has 4 notes.


*Edit*

sus means that you just change the 2nd note up or down. So if its sus2 you move it down a note, if its sus4 you move it up a note.
Last edited by Guitarfreak777 at May 16, 2008,
#5
Example:

D Major Scale

D E F# G A B C# D(octave)

Playing a standard open D chord=

e--2
B--3
G--2
D--0
A---
E---

You're playing open D on the D string (1st or 'Root' Note)
A on the G string (5th note in D Major scale)
D on the B string (8th (octave) note in D Major Scale)
F# on the e string (3rd note in the D Major Scale)


Playing D7

e--2
B--1
G--2
D--0
A---
E---

You're playing open D on the D string (1st or 'Root' Note)
A on the G string (5th note in D Major scale)
C on the B string (Minor 7th note in D Major Scale)
F# on the e string (3rd note in the D Major Scale)

If you played C# on the B string (2nd fret) the Chord is Dmaj7. The D7 is neither minor nor Major iirc.

Hope this helps you a bit and is right! If not I'm sure someone will point it out.
#7
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Basically, it's a different chord thats all.

D Major - D F# G

D7 - D F# G A

Dm7(major 7) - D F# G B

VvLOGiKvV, don't listen to this guy. Guitarfreak777, what the hell are you talking about?

D major - D F# A
D7 - D F# A C
Dm7(maj 7) is not how it's notated, it's DmM7 and is built: D F A C#.

You need to go back and review your theory.