#1
Hey guys!
I was in music class yesterday at school and my music teacher said that it is possible to change from voice types, he said himself that he used to be a baritone but he practiced to become a tenor. And that got me thinking, because Im in the this band at school and majority of the songs we do, are far too high for me. So can anyone teach me how to become a tenor?
thanks!
#3
Quote by Loco23
Hey guys!
I was in music class yesterday at school and my music teacher said that it is possible to change from voice types, he said himself that he used to be a baritone but he practiced to become a tenor. And that got me thinking, because Im in the this band at school and majority of the songs we do, are far too high for me. So can anyone teach me how to become a tenor?
thanks!



Its a rather simple yet time consuming task. first step is to know your range for your chest voice. After that Find your falsetto or head voice range. Now choose the pitch thats in your falsetto range but not to far away from your chest voice range (I generally have my students start a half step to a major second above the top end of their chest voice). This is your target note. Now go a perfect fifth above the target note and sing down the scale from the fifth to the target note but as you approach the target note ween your voice from your falsetto to your chest voice. At first it will sound scratchy and bad. But over time the muscle memory in your vocal chords will adapt to that position and you'll be able to hit that note with ease. As always with voice, make sure it doesn't hurt. If it does then take a break and re-examine your technique in your safety range . Unfortunately the voice is so temperamental, that this kind of exercise can be dangerous if you aren't using the proper technique and breathing.
#4
.... or you could do that but like he said it is pretty time consuming. think about the ball grabbing it works.
#6
Yes, voices can change. From what your teacher said, he sounds like he was always a tenor, it's just that it took longer for his top notes to come in and that he may have a few more notes on the bottom of his range than the average tenor. If you're meant to end up a tenor, you will, even if it takes a long time. If not, you won't. If you want to discuss this further, the vocal thread (one of the stickies) would be the appropriate place.
Brevity is the soul of lingerie.
-Dorothy Parker