#1
New to bass, and I found a fretless jazz bass at a pawn shop. 1990 mij fender jazz bass, its real nice.

Anyways to get down to the point, what strings do you fretless bass users use.
You don't have a soul if you cant feel the blues.
#3
Always flatwounds, as for brands, I usually use med-gauge GHS or DR.
-Instruments-
Squier frankenbass
LTD Deluxe EC-1000 in Vintage Black
1960's Banjuke
#4
I use flatwound Fender stainless steel

they get better as they age, IMHO
My Gear:
MIM Jazz fretless
180W Ashdown 12"
GAS:
NOTHING
#5
inb4roto

Seriously, if you want to get your Jaco on, then get yourself some poly for your fingerboard and get some Rotosound Swing Bass 66.

GHS flatwounds are supposedly good, the Steve Harris flatwounds might be cool if you have some cash...
#6
Just to paraphrase and add my own 2 cents:

For a mellow, protect-your-fingerboard kinda tone, grab some Rotosound Jazz Bass 77 if you want to retain a bit of twang, or GHS Flats if you want them to feel like upright strings (I prefer GHS flats m'self).

For a bright Jaco tone, cover your fingerboard in poly, and slap on some Rotosound Swing Bass 66. Only do this, however, if your fingerboard is coated. It's death to wood.

Now, there are alternative options. If you want super, super mellow, thumpy tone, get some nylon tapewound strings. Fender, Rotosound, and LaBella make them.

There are strings "in between" rounds and flats. Some are called Groundwound strings (made by the likes of D'Addario and GHS) which involve taking a roundwound string and grinding a bit of the roughness off. Rotosound and a few others make pressurewound strings, which involve squishing roundwound strings until they're a bit smoother. Both types of strings give are a good median between flats and rounds.

Be aware that I told you pretty much every type of string ever made.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#8
Quote by kranoscorp
Always flatwounds, as for brands, I usually use med-gauge GHS or DR.



Not always. If you epoxy/poly your fingerboard, or if it's ebony/ebonol, then you can safely use roundwounds.


However, in this case, I'm pretty sure the bass has rosewood. So yes, it would have to be flats unless he epoxies/polys the fingerboar.d
#9
Flatwoods are generaly the way to go on a fretless.
As for the brand i choose Rotosound.
To Be is to Do -Socrates-
To Do is to Be -Sartre-
Do be do be do -Sinatra
#10
I love the sound of rounds on my FL, but since I am playing Jazz right now (straight bass lines not solo-ing ala Jaco), I found that I sliced through the mix a bit too much. I like the Roto 77 the best personally.
#11
Yeah, I recommend some nice roundwounds if you want that Jaco tone, but only if you poly or epoxy coat your FB.

On a side note. I'm painting my fretless bass peptobismol pink, will post pictures as soon as I'm finished. Right now I'm on sanding and have been in a block because I have a case of food poisoning.
#12
Quote by Sly Taco
What about Roto Nickelwounds? Thats what I got on mine. Are they just as bad as steels?

I emailed Tony Franklin and he says that he's been using nickels on his fretless for 3 years and there's only super slight wear. His fingerboard is ebony, though.

Still, nickels are much, much softer than steels.

Fender also makes nylon roundwounds. Don't ask.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#14
I epoxied my fingerboard, but I still use flats. I tried some cheap GHS boomers first and they sounded incredible on the epoxy, but I was curious about trying flats so I bought EB flatwounds. They give a good thumb, but they definitely give more of an upright sound instead of your Jaco sound.