#1
I recently had to play some stuff like shown in the picture and now i would be interested if this kind of lick has a special name or not , maybe someone could help me



Thanks in Advance
Greymane
#2
I would say thats an inverted pedal. AKA- A high note that is being held or repeated. In this case its the high A (17th fret). The melody is all the notes barr the 17. eg. 14, 15, 13, 12, 15, 13, 12, 14 in the first bar.
#3
I see lots of string skipping there..
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#6
Quote by mzhang13
I call it alternative pick + string skipping. or that word that mean you revolve around a root note (like the Sweet Child O Mine intro's ending)


Pedaling
Ben
#7
In physical terms you could play that with alternate picking or hybrid picking but in musical terms that's a pedal tone.

Micky_dev: There's no such thing as an 'inverted' pedal in this context.
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#8
Micky_dev: There's no such thing as an 'inverted' pedal in this context.

Why not? Looks like one to me.
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#10
Quote by FreakShow99
sorry to be an idiot, what exactly is hybrid picking.


I'm pretty sure it's when you're using both your pick and your free fingers to pluck the strings.
Ben
#11
to me, it looks like string skipping. Could be hybrid too, depends on the situation.
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#12
Quote by J.A.M
Why not? Looks like one to me.


The term "pedal tone" refers to a constant note played in the bass register in orchestrations terms; in any other context it just refers to a repeated note , in any register, in between the melody parts. An "inverted" pedal only exists in terms of orchestration, not licks like this.
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#13
well wow , hats quite a lot of different opnions , yes it's pretty clear to me that it is some kind of string skipping , i play this one with alternate picking using the 5th finger of the left hand to play the repeated A , but is there no special word for this technique , maybe could someone explain to me why this is not kind of inverted pedal or pedal tone ,whats the difference between the repeating of a note in a lick or an orchestration?
#14
Quote by Greymane
well wow , hats quite a lot of different opnions , yes it's pretty clear to me that it is some kind of string skipping , i play this one with alternate picking using the 5th finger of the left hand to play the repeated A , but is there no special word for this technique , maybe could someone explain to me why this is not kind of inverted pedal or pedal tone ,whats the difference between the repeating of a note in a lick or an orchestration?


In an orchestration it's not a repeated note; it's a continual note played by the instruments in the bass register, or in the case of an inverted pedal it's in the treble register but if it's in a lick context, like the one above, it's just a pedal tone where ever it is.
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#15
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
In an orchestration it's not a repeated note; it's a continual note played by the instruments in the bass register, or in the case of an inverted pedal it's in the treble register but if it's in a lick context, like the one above, it's just a pedal tone where ever it is.

Just for examples of this, if you look through some piano works and see a low note that's just held out for a long time it'll often say "pedal" or something of the sort near it. This is a pedal tone; as Zaphod said, it's a continual note as opposed to a repeated note.
#16
ah ok , now I understand it =) ... thanks a lot to everyone in this thread who tried to help