#1
Is that possible? Like are there different gain diodes or is it just how many are in a sequence? And how easy would it be to change a Diode to give my amp more gain? I'm working with a Fender Frontman 65 DSP. Seems easy to take apart.
I got some good guitars, yo.
#2
No. Unless you feel like finding the circuit diagrams, finding the correct resistor or diode to move and changing it without damaging the circuit board. You'd need some good soldering and de-slodering skills.
Quote by BaSsReBeL171

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It wouldnt be pretty
#3
Never heard of a gain diode. Wouldnt it just be easier to drive the signal going in harder, use a different modelling program or turn the gain up.
#4
Lol... "gain diode"...

Heh, anyways, a diode is just a little part that allows voltage to pass through it once it reaches a certain voltage. If you put two diodes, both going to ground with opposite polarity, once a sound wave goes through it, the diode turns "on" when the voltage (for a germanium diode) hits around 0.3V, and goes to ground (same for opposite polarity). This "clips" the tops and bottoms of the sound waves and creates distortion.

So, yes it is possible to change the diodes with ones that turn "on" at different voltages. It's not hard, unless they used surface mounted ones, or weird ones. But I wouldn't touch them in an amp... Maybe a cheap pedal, but that's about it.
Call me Dan

Gear:
2015 Les Paul Studio - Wine Red
Ibanez SA120 (black)
Marshall MG100HDFX
Custom Les Paul (work in progress)
About 10 other guitars and a big pedalboard. lol
#5
diodes dont create gain... transistors do. diodes just regulate the flow of current... like a check valve in a plumbing system... but i your probably gonna have to change some transistors or the base/collector resistors(if you know about that kinda stuff)... butt i wouldnt mess with it because once you change one thing you might need to change the whole circuit to accommodate for it... or you might get a nice fireworks show
Last edited by cocaroche at May 18, 2008,
#6
Quote by cocaroche
diodes dont create gain... transistors do. diodes just regulate the flow of current... like a check valve in a plumbing system


+1

i think people are just confusing gain and distortion...
Call me Dan

Gear:
2015 Les Paul Studio - Wine Red
Ibanez SA120 (black)
Marshall MG100HDFX
Custom Les Paul (work in progress)
About 10 other guitars and a big pedalboard. lol
#8
Quote by Invader Jim
So what's the difference? I never could figure that out.

difference between what?
#9
I think I got this right... correct me if I'm wrong

Distortion refers to the actual clipping of the wave
Gain refers to the amount of volume being "gained" (when followed by distortion, this gives the effect of increasing distortion)
Call me Dan

Gear:
2015 Les Paul Studio - Wine Red
Ibanez SA120 (black)
Marshall MG100HDFX
Custom Les Paul (work in progress)
About 10 other guitars and a big pedalboard. lol
#10
Gain and Distortion maybe? And how Diodes and Transistors create them?
I got some good guitars, yo.
#12
Quote by kurtlives91
I always thought of distortion as the clipping of a wave.

Gain I thought meant the difference of voltage between the input and output.


You're right, but what if your distortion is after the gain? Hey, with germanium diodes, it still cuts off at 0.3V! :P This is what makes your sound more distorted. Of course, you can have gain afterwards to make it louder.
Call me Dan

Gear:
2015 Les Paul Studio - Wine Red
Ibanez SA120 (black)
Marshall MG100HDFX
Custom Les Paul (work in progress)
About 10 other guitars and a big pedalboard. lol
#13
http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/trancirc.htm

that should clear up the gain stuff

EDIT: look at the part about the darlington pair, thats how transistors can be used to make amps. oh and btw, distortion can be created by transistors, too... there are special types(there called A, B, AB i think) that can create more or less distortion depending on some of the resistances connected to them.
Last edited by cocaroche at May 18, 2008,