#1
OK I have a harmony I'm doing I have the normal part then a 3rd then I want to add a 3rd harmony what should I use??
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#2
use fifths to form triads, or you could use octaves. or anything.
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#3
try out different ones to see which you like.
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#4
ok I thought 5ths thats what I'll do thanks


I just wanted to know what you guys that was the best sounding harmony part for a 3rd guitar
Quote by gregs1020
Brett has been saving for a splawn for 4 years
countries have been toppled in the time it's taking, revolutions won got a black pres

yawn


Quote by bubb_tubbs
When he finally gets one it'll probably be televised like the Berlin Wall coming down.
The end of an era
#5
Quote by Bostonrocks
ok I thought 5ths thats what I'll do thanks


I just wanted to know what you guys that was the best sounding harmony part for a 3rd guitar

Depends on what kind of effect/sound you're going for.
#7
Do another major third, off of the third, making it an augmented chord, with a variation in the middle note. This should be used for an increased resolution cadence though, I would imagine.
#8
Quote by Bostonrocks
OK I have a harmony I'm doing I have the normal part then a 3rd then I want to add a 3rd harmony what should I use??
Go up 2 notes up in the same scale and play that note over the original note.
So say in the d minor scale, You play a G and you want it harmonized by thirds; 1 note up in the scale is A and 2 notes higher is Bb. Therefore Bb is a diatonic third away from G, so you'd play Bb and G over one another for a harmony.
Why is this note called a third and not a second? Because in music the original note is called the 1st degree note. So G is the first degree, A is the second, and Bb is your third.

Did I misunderstand the question? Is he asking how to do harmonies, or something else? Everyone elses posts seem to be non sensical. Especially ordinary's.
#9
Did I misunderstand the question? Is he asking how to do harmonies, or something else? Everyone elses posts seem to be non sensical. Especially ordinary's.
I took the question as "I have a line, I have already harmonised it in diatonic thirds and now I want to add another harmonised line. What interval should I use?"

Ordinary was pointing out that thirds are every second letter.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
i say use b5 just to throw everybody off.
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