#2
Yeah. It is so frighteningly easy it's not even cool. I just grabbed some polyurethane and a sponge brush. I taped up the entire neck with painter tape so there wouldn't be any dribble. I dipped the brush in (I used too much, I would really say just a tiny bit at a time to stop dripping) and then stroked up and down the fretboard. Like I said, use very little and make sure it's not running anywhere. It's not a huge deal if some dribbles down the neck, it only takes a touch of sanding, but it's not advisable. I think I used two coats.

#4
I used epoxy on my fingerboard. The epoxy is much thicker than the poly and it is also much more durable; but i dont know how durable/thick the finish needs to be. The viscosity of the epoxy is extremely thick when it is applied. I put some info on what I did in a blog, but what I did basically was:
-give the entire fingerboard an acetone bath to clean any oils
-tape the neck edges and the back to prevent any drippage
-mix enough epoxy to coat the fingerboard
-used a foam brush to spread the epoxy over the fingerboard
-the epoxy i used was "self leveling" meaning it smoothed itself out and it leveled and even itself out too.... so that means no surprise bumps or lumps.

I'm sure adding poly is about the same process but I think poly has a thinner viscosity. Just take your time and you will do fine. I highly recommend putting poly down on a scrap piece of wood just to get an idea of the technique. Its much easier to put poly down once right, than it is to lay it down twice
Last edited by terb at May 19, 2008,
#7
To me, poly is much better. It's better for what you're doing (something to do with how they wear, poly chips and epoxy peels or something like that). It also doesn't require any work. You literally take off the lid with a screwdriver give it a stir and start painting it on the fretboard.
#9
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
To me, poly is much better. It's better for what you're doing (something to do with how they wear, poly chips and epoxy peels or something like that). It also doesn't require any work. You literally take off the lid with a screwdriver give it a stir and start painting it on the fretboard.

Indeed, I'm not sure my epoxy jobs was worth the time and effort. I can tell you though, the epoxy wont peel if it is thoroughly mixed. The epoxy on my finger board it about 3mm thick!! it wont be coming off anytime soon.
GoodLuck Sly, pics are a must when you are done!
#11
Could someone say exactly what kind/type Polyurathane is so I dont look retarded asking the clerk for?
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#13
Quote by not wisniewski
Could someone say exactly what kind/type Polyurathane is so I dont look retarded asking the clerk for?


As far as I know there is only the almighty polyurethane. If you go into the paint section of your local handyman sore or even like a wal-mart you'll find a little can marked urethane or polyurethane. They'll do.
#14
Am I supposed to sand the fretboard first before applying the poly? I didn't and now the fretboard is really tacky. Help!!!!!!!!
#15
Quote by Sly Taco
Am I supposed to sand the fretboard first before applying the poly? I didn't and now the fretboard is really tacky. Help!!!!!!!!

it might be "dry," but the poly might need a couple days to cure. How is it since you posted?
#16
Small tip, don't spray it, paint it. If you spray it you get that nasty orange tint that cheap brands such as SX have on their necks.
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#17
Well, I just sanded the whole neck down and gave it a fresh coat. I'm gonna leave it for a couple of days and see. Stay tuned, I know you're all on the edge of your seat!