#1
Hey all, I've recently picked up the guitar again after about a 3-4 year hiatus of serious playing and I'm ready to dive back into it. In that time I've in my possession John Petrucci's Rock Discipline and Paul Gilbert's Intense Rock 2. Where would be a better starting point (going off the fact that i've lost a decent amount of knowledge and playing ability). And also, what are some of the routines you other players use in your home practice?
#2
Short term routines are a musicians metaphor for procrastination.


You're better off focusing on a goal, that's achievable spread over time, allowing you to set your attention to other things as well, whilst going somewhere.


It's pointless to say: "today, I'm going to practice sweeping."

This is because most goals of that sort don't come in a day and these sporadic bursts of motivation aren't good for anything but making you realize you have a big test ahead of you. Instead if you say: "Today, I'm going to learn a new jazz head and read about sweeping, watch some videos and think about how I might use it." It's more likely that tomorrow you actually do something to achieve that long term goal.


Apart from that, practice routines are a flawed concept, because if you practice the same thing everyday, it becomes habitual, making your body feel comfortable and not actually working to achieve something.

That's what I learnt whilst studying classical guitar with my old teacher. Say you learn a few studies. Nº1, Nº2 and Nº3. If you play them in that order, every single day, you are less likely to get better than if you mix them up and practice other things in between, because your body has to think each time before moving.
#3
I had to take it slow when I started playing again.
Went right back to the basic. Basic strumming patterns , picking,
inflections...ect. Getting familar with fretboard again.
I'm actually a better guitar player becuase of it.

Yeap, I broke my pratice time into quarters.
Yeap, bought CV, books..ect

Relearn some old songs i knew already to keep me inerested.
My goal was actaully to learn how to play the blues and improve..
Being a metal head...it's a little different.

Hearing myself on play back helps me make corrections. Even thou
hearing myself on play back is not a part of my pratice. it's still a part of my routine.
#4
Quote by confusius
Short term routines are a musicians metaphor for procrastination.


You're better off focusing on a goal, that's achievable spread over time, allowing you to set your attention to other things as well, whilst going somewhere.


It's pointless to say: "today, I'm going to practice sweeping."


This is because most goals of that sort don't come in a day and these sporadic bursts of motivation aren't good for anything but making you realize you have a big test ahead of you. Instead if you say: "Today, I'm going to learn a new jazz head and read about sweeping, watch some videos and think about how I might use it." It's more likely that tomorrow you actually do something to achieve that long term goal.


Apart from that, practice routines are a flawed concept, because if you practice the same thing everyday, it becomes habitual, making your body feel comfortable and not actually working to achieve something.

That's what I learnt whilst studying classical guitar with my old teacher. Say you learn a few studies. Nº1, Nº2 and Nº3. If you play them in that order, every single day, you are less likely to get better than if you mix them up and practice other things in between, because your body has to think each time before moving.



I would have to disagree with you there.I have a routine for my guitar playing and it has worked wonders for me.I have became better, faster, and I could do things that I could do before.The thing is in my routine is that I will change it up sometimes (this includes video lessons too).


I agree with you on most of what you said BTW.
#5
You're just restating my point. If you conserve the same routine everyday you achieve less than if you change it around. You said it yourself, you've changed it around, therefore you're body it not becoming habituated to the routine.
#6
My standard practice routine:

1. Scale warmup: Generally I practice scales in 12 keys. Always in that method, generally in one area a day. This week I'm reviewing major scales, next week I've got to review Harmonic Minor, and after that I'm moving on to new scales.

2. Some kind of reading workout: I'm using Tom Bruner's "Sight Reading for the Contemporary Guitarist" right now. Since when I go back to college in the fall the band director is going to put a piece of music in front of me, I'll have one minute to look at it, then I gotta be able to play it.

3. Work on tunes: I'm working on a couple songs in Guitar Pro right now, using standard notation only. This week I've been learning the Phish song "Stash." Also, I always go into one of the three volumes of the Hal Leonard Real Book and open up Band in a Box and practice along with a tune. Working on soloing and such. That or I have 114 of the Jamey Abersold play-along CDs, so I use one of them if I've got one with the tune I want to play.

4. Harmony: I'm working on Drop-2 7th chord voicings on the 1-2-3-4, 2-3-4-5, and 3-4-5-6 string groups. So I work on ii-V7-I's in 12 keys generally.

Since it's the summer I am never methodical about this. I generally cover all these things at some point during the day. Normally I play for 2-4 hours a day. I take lots of breaks cause I have a short attention span, but I always try and get stuff done. But I'm a college guitar student, so I've got to do all this. I doubt many others would be this crazy about practicing non-song stuff. This is also my first week back from college for the summer, so I'll admit, I've been kinda lazy, more goofing off than concerted working.