#1
Does it cause excessive wear on the engine to rev it above around 3000 rpms? Like is it bad for it at all? I usually shift around 2,800, but sometimes I accidentally rev it a bit higher.


Also, does coasting in neutral or with the clutch down cause wear on the clutch or anything?
#3
I've been told that going over 3000 rpms isn't good in the long run, but it depends on your engine's "stress-level" how long that run is.

edit: Told in driving school I might add
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#4
clutch down wears the clutch, yes. neutral without clutch, no.

3000 revs isn't too bad. of course lower is optimal but meh, depends on hills and which gear you need etc.
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#5
Depends on your engine and type of car you have, if I do 80-90mph on a motorway my rpm stays just below the 3000mark, but when I overtake I drop a gear and it revs up to 7000/8000 rpm, obviously if you keep doing this it will overheat.

If the clutch is fully depressed then coasting small distances wont be a problem as such, but its still wear on the clutch, just dont drag it. I hate people who drive like that!
#6
depends on your vehicle

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#7
3000 rpm is just above what i cruise at.

and no, clutch down, as in depressed, causes no wear, because the clutch plates are apart.

bad practice though, don't do it, you lose engine braking, and the loss of braking distance can sneak up on you, put the pedal down JUST before you stop.

Edit: actually, i think it might wear out the plate springs and cable, not to sure. if you even have that type of clutch.
Last edited by glowskulls at May 19, 2008,
#8
Quote by Turd_Ferguson
Does it cause excessive wear on the engine to rev it above around 3000 rpms? Like is it bad for it at all? I usually shift around 2,800, but sometimes I accidentally rev it a bit higher.


Also, does coasting in neutral or with the clutch down cause wear on the clutch or anything?



no it is fine just don't rev past red line shift a little before but it is fine
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#10
wait, you never go above 3000?

do people honk at you a lot?

seriously, you need to get away faster than that, sit in an auto, when you push it, it goes to 6500-7000 then changes, make the most of the gear on fast roads, also depends on the car.
#11
Firstly the revs depend entirely on the car you really have to feel and listen for it, some cars run best at 8 thousand revs, its entirely the type of engine.

Secondly NEVER EVER coast in a manual car, it is illegal, you have basically lost control of a large portion of the vehicle, it is highly dangerous, so no coasting is not allright, and yes holding the clutch in for extended periods will wear it out.
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#12
Quote by mynamewontfit
Can anyone explain how having the clutch disengaged wears it out? Doesn't make sense to me with my extremely limited car knowledge.


it wears the thrust bearing. EDIT or throw out bearing what ever you want to cal it

when the clutch is disengaged all the load to disingage the clutch is put ton 1 bearing called the thrust bearing by springs keeping this bearing under unnessicarry load will wear it out prematurally
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Last edited by lbc_sublime at May 19, 2008,
#13
Quote by mynamewontfit
Can anyone explain how having the clutch disengaged wears it out? Doesn't make sense to me with my extremely limited car knowledge.


It's because the clutch is basically two metal plates plates pressed against eachother very tightly, when you push in the clutch it takes a hell of a lot of tension off, but they are slipping against each other.
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#14
Quote by Boogie Man
It's because the clutch is basically two metal plates plates pressed against eachother very tightly, when you push in the clutch it takes a hell of a lot of tension off, but they are slipping against each other.


that is totaly wrong the clutch friction disc is made of meterial similiar to brake pads it only slips on engagement and is designed to slip for smooth gear changing

after engagemant it should not slip

when you push the clutch in the diaphram sring pushes the throw out bearing and removes the friction disc and pressure from the surface of the flywheel
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#15
Quote by lbc_sublime
that is totaly wrong the clutch friction disc is made of meterial similiar to brake pads it only slips on engagement and is designed to slip for smooth gear changing

after engagemant it should not slip

when you push the clutch in the diaphram sring pushes the throw out bearing and removes the friction disc and pressure from the surface of the flywheel


The two plates are still touching each other, therefore creating friction and wear.
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#16
Quote by Boogie Man
The two plates are still touching each other, therefore creating friction and wear.


gotta back the other guy up, sorry.

if the clutch is to the floor, the plates are completely seperated, not touching at all.
#17
the clutch will last forever as long as you shift properly

at least the life of the vehicle


EDIT having the clutch disengaged can only wear out your throw out bearing that is what is taking the load
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Last edited by lbc_sublime at May 19, 2008,
#18
I stand corrected, it wears the fingers on the clutch and the bearing, but its still pretty bad for it, replacing that bearing is pretty hard.
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#19
Alright, no more coasting for me, I guess. Unless we decided coasting in neutral is ok? I know it's illegal, but I'm a badass, so it's ok.
#20
Quote by Turd_Ferguson
Alright, no more coasting for me, I guess. Unless we decided coasting in neutral is ok? I know it's illegal, but I'm a badass, so it's ok.



Think about it this way, if yo coast onto a traincrossing there is even more chance an oncoming train will kill you, simply because it takes you more time to get moving, not to mention you lose engine braking.
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#21
Quote by AuroraBorealis
Depends on your engine and type of car you have, if I do 80-90mph on a motorway my rpm stays just below the 3000mark, but when I overtake I drop a gear and it revs up to 7000/8000 rpm, obviously if you keep doing this it will overheat.



turning 7000-8000 won't necessarily cause the engine to overheat. if the water pump and rad circulate the coolant, it should stay in a typical operating temperature range. you are however at greater risk of breaking the crankshaft, pistons, connecting rods, valves, etc.

most newer cars have an electronic rev limiter around 6000-7000 rpm, and cruising along turning 3000 rpm should not harm the engine at all. however you won't achieve the greatest fuel mileage lol
Originally posted by Phoenixblade
you're an asshole.
#22
Quote by crazy_geetarist
turning 7000-8000 won't necessarily cause the engine to overheat. if the water pump and rad circulate the coolant, it should stay in a typical operating temperature range. you are however at greater risk of breaking the crankshaft, pistons, connecting rods, valves, etc.

most newer cars have an electronic rev limiter around 6000-7000 rpm, and cruising along turning 3000 rpm should not harm the engine at all. however you won't achieve the greatest fuel mileage lol



electronic rev limiters cut out the revs in park and nuetrel i believe not in gear
i had a costumer that wanted to shift from 6th to 5th but poped it in 3rd and over reved his engine ..... it is no more
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#24
Quote by lbc_sublime
electronic rev limiters cut out the revs in park and nuetrel i believe not in gear
i had a costumer that wanted to shift from 6th to 5th but poped it in 3rd and over reved his engine ..... it is no more


nope, electric rev limiters are on all the time unless the cpu is modified by a programmer etc. this is why with an automatic transmission, the shift points are at the same rpm with full throttle. if you stay in 1st gear without shifting, and you reach the rev limit, the rpm's will just "bounce" off of the limiter. it sounds kinda like bap bap bap bap bap. however, going from 6th to 3rd is still a pretty big shock for the engine to endure. a rev limiter does not out weigh the power of a moving drivetrain lol.
Originally posted by Phoenixblade
you're an asshole.
#25
Quote by crazy_geetarist
nope, electric rev limiters are on all the time unless the cpu is modified by a programmer etc. this is why with an automatic transmission, the shift points are at the same rpm with full throttle. if you stay in 1st gear without shifting, and you reach the rev limit, the rpm's will just "bounce" off of the limiter. it sounds kinda like bap bap bap bap bap. however, going from 6th to 3rd is still a pretty big shock for the engine to endure. a rev limiter does not out weigh the power of a moving drivetrain lol.


i c most of the cars i work on are modified. alot with computer flashes and reprograms so that could be it.

it's kinda funny cause i am not that great at standard tranny but i get to learn with some rich guys baby.lol.
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#26
3000 rpm is usually fine for most cars, I would say at about 4000 is reving the engine too much and you should avoid using the clutch for much else than shifting since it does wear down if you have it in too much its not a huge deal if you don't though unless you plan on keeping the car for a really long time since clutches usually take a very long time to wear down.
#27
Quote by lbc_sublime
i c most of the cars i work on are modified. alot with computer flashes and reprograms so that could be it.

it's kinda funny cause i am not that great at standard tranny but i get to learn with some rich guys baby.lol.


programmers are great tools when they are understood. you can achieve better fuel efficiency and greater horsepower and torque. but in the wrong hands can "open up" the car farther than it should ever be and in no time, the motor is toast.

i learned how to drive manual on my friends car. its always better to learn on somebody else's car then you don't need to replace the clutch if you suck at first
Originally posted by Phoenixblade
you're an asshole.
#28
Quote by crazy_geetarist
programmers are great tools when they are understood. you can achieve better fuel efficiency and greater horsepower and torque. but in the wrong hands can "open up" the car farther than it should ever be and in no time, the motor is toast.

i learned how to drive manual on my friends car. its always better to learn on somebody else's car then you don't need to replace the clutch if you suck at first



i know we did this dodge magnum and the drive shaft snaped and cracked the transmission housing lol

Edit we also put it intake, costom longtube headers 3'' costom catback dual exhaust and racing cats

and today i got to practice with some guys bmw z3 which is ok but kinda girly.

i took it for a 10-15 minute road test cause i heard rattling from the rear shocks then me and the owner took it for a high speed road test
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#29
Bottom line is your engine only has X amount of revolutions in it before something gives out. Use them wisely. The other guys covered the clutch quite well.
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#30
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Real men use manuals :p


real men shouldnt care :P
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#31
Quote by Aftertime
real men shouldnt care :P


and smart men know that there are automatic transmissions that will perform just as good as a manual. TH350 and TH400 (GM Turbo 350 and Turbo 400 respectively) are two of the best transmissions ever built. toss in a shift kit and you've got yourself a damn near bullet proof, high performance gearbox.

it's too bad that there isn't a Turbo 400 equal for 4-6cyl FWD cars
Originally posted by Phoenixblade
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#32
I drive an auto, so maybe I shouldn't be talking, but I don't think going about 3000 rpms is going to hurt your car. I usually shift right at 3000, but when I need to drive fast I often go to 4500 or 6000.
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#33
Quote by lbc_sublime
i know we did this dodge magnum and the drive shaft snaped and cracked the transmission housing lol

Edit we also put it intake, costom longtube headers 3'' costom catback dual exhaust and racing cats

and today i got to practice with some guys bmw z3 which is ok but kinda girly.

i took it for a 10-15 minute road test cause i heard rattling from the rear shocks then me and the owner took it for a high speed road test


magnum with the 5.7 hemi? didn't think the shaft would be weak in one of those! then again intake and high flow exhaust is a good way to get GOOD power, especially if you had a programmer.
Originally posted by Phoenixblade
you're an asshole.
#34
Quote by Turd_Ferguson
Does it cause excessive wear on the engine to rev it above around 3000 rpms? Like is it bad for it at all? I usually shift around 2,800, but sometimes I accidentally rev it a bit higher.


Also, does coasting in neutral or with the clutch down cause wear on the clutch or anything?


haha, no. nothing will happen to your car at all for revving to 3000 (every car is different, but as long as you aren't redlining, or running over the red line for extended periods you will be perfectly fine).
holding in the clutch/using the clutch at all causes clutch wear (its minimal though, you wouldnt be able to tell that there was any wear even if you pulled out the plates and measured them with a micrometer.) however, your clutch plates will need to be replaced eventually.
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