#1
My G-major has a parametric EQ, which I use a little. It also is running through my effects loop.

I was thinking of bypassing this (because it's a bitch to edit live on the fly) and getting a graphic EQ pedal - an MXR 10 band or something.

I found the Parametric confusing to begin with, but slowly got the hang of it (i think).

Anyone have any experience with using one or the other or both that they can share? Should I not bother with the MXR?
Fender 60W Super-Sonic Head
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TC Electronics G Major
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MXR 6 Band EQ
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TS-9
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American Fender Stratocaster
#2
In general, in the audiophile world a parametric EQ is considered superior to a graphic eq. However, as you've come to realize, a graphic eq is often easier to use and quickly adjust . I have the MXR 10-band eq and it is a good unit.
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MXR: Distortion III, EVH Phase 90, EVH Flanger, 10 Band EQ, DC Brick
#3
stick with the parametric. Much better eq with infinite tweakability.
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#4
Quote by StriferDiem
My G-major has a parametric EQ, which I use a little. It also is running through my effects loop.

I was thinking of bypassing this (because it's a bitch to edit live on the fly) and getting a graphic EQ pedal - an MXR 10 band or something.

I found the Parametric confusing to begin with, but slowly got the hang of it (i think).

Anyone have any experience with using one or the other or both that they can share? Should I not bother with the MXR?



Parametric EQ is great if there is a specific frequncy you want cut away. It's great for removing 60 cycle hum, buzzing in the high, frequency spikes caused by cheap pickups, and feedback. It lets you zero in on the specific frequency and only cut out what you need to cut out so you are left with a very natural sound. Typically, they don't sound as natural when you try and boost frequencies unless you are boosting frequencies that are lower or higher than what you would normaly hear on a guitar. If the frequency you are boosting is within the "normal" range for guitar then your ear will be able to hear the spikes and it makes your guitar sound processed or it'll make it sound like you have cheep pickups.

So to sum that up, Parametric EQ makes a better filter than a signal booster.

Graphic eq's have a much more natural flowing tone to them which makes them easier to use. You can boost or cut the signal and as long as you don't get carried away your tone should still sound natural. This makes them much easier to dial in and use and for people looking for EQ rather than noise filters, they are typically better. If youre parametric eq has enough bands and you get enough practice with it, you can actually make it do anything a graphic eq would but typically they don't have enough bands and people don't have the experiance to use them to their full potential.
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