#1
i have been playing the guitar for three years. i have never played an electric guitar. i really like strumming for church band, etc. im not such a great picker (as in picking) and im a decent fingerpicker. I no the question is very vague but HOW DO I GET BETTER? i havent really seen much improvement. i usually practice about 20-40 minutes a day. Should i been doing scales? arpegeos(SP)? how do i become a better strummer, picker, and fingerpicker?
#3
uhh practice?

Not to be rude or anything maybe you should play more times a day and practice ur chords and strumming and picking
#4
arpeggios, first of all.
Second of all, just work really hard on picking (especially alternate, maybe sweep if you're into that).. strumming.. while, you just gotta be accurate, and able to keep a steady rhythm.
Fingerpicking... Google Justin Sandercoe, he's got really good videos on that.
#5
Scales would be good to develop picking IMO. And fingerpicking comes with practice. Try learning Kansas' song "Dust in the Wind" or Stairway to Heaven.
#6
ive learned stairway to heaven expect for the solo part. also, would picking sound good for accoustic guitars? can u give me a good accoustic picking song?

and also, how much longer should i pratice each day?
#7
I've started learning guitat two months ago and I have to say, the only thing I really enjoy is fingerpicking. So maybe these song are for begginers, but so far i found these the best:

Led Zeppelin - Babe I'm Gonna Leave you
Jack Johnson - Wrong Turn
Pink Floyd - Is There Anybody Out There
McKennitt Loreena - Serenissima
#8
This is what you do:

Learn the pentatonic/blues scale which is shockingly very simple. Jam with songs that are easy to play along with and just get into the groove of the music and tinker around and mix it up and just explore (bends, slides, hammer-ons, pull-offs ect.). Do this everyday and you will notice that you will get better day by day.

Also learn other people solos. Santeria by Sublime is a an easy but but fun solo that sounds badass on acoustic.

Practice this stuff everyday and you will be good in no time.
Word.
#9
Play with other musicians.

That's hands-down the best way to get more proficient in your own playing, especially if you can include a metronome/drum beat. Even if you can only play by yourself, a metronome/drum machine is excellent for developing timing and accuracy.

Lacking that, play along with recordings, and record yourself. That way you can hear what you sound like, figure out what needs work, and measure your progress. Even a $2 tape deck from your local thrift store/goodwill would work as long as it can record. Seriously, it makes a huge difference when you can sit back and listen to how you sound from the other side of the guitar.

Other then that, just practice, practice, and practice some more.
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#10
You might consider finding a teacher if you notice that you can't motivate and teach yourself effectively.


My Guitars:
Fender Mustang.
Yamaha FG-413SL.
#11
is just praticing songs more efficiant then playing scales, and stuff?
#12
i'm also a church guitarist.. not to boast but the other guitarists in our church only know how to strum.. strum.. and strum.. and yet they look and see themselves as guitar gods.. whew.. good thing i'm not one of them.. i play during the mass.. and i mostly play those songs thru plucking.. i agree with the other posts.. practice.. and study scales or pentatonics and some blues.. when you play, try to incorporate some of those in the song.. remember, don't try to boast coz you'll end up with people laughing at you when you make a mistake.. try to make it a point that you use these scales in order to make the song sound and feel better and use it if you think it's appropriate.. don't shred on a song that's very solemn.. practice at home.. you need not time yourself.. you just have to practice regularly and expose yourself to different playing styles.. create your own style if you want.. pick up the guitar during your leisure time and pluck a few chord patterns.. add spice by using some scales.. not solos.. just some slight fills before changing chords will do..
#13
Quote by deltacross
i'm also a church guitarist.. not to boast but the other guitarists in our church only know how to strum.. strum.. and strum.. and yet they look and see themselves as guitar gods.. whew.. good thing i'm not one of them.. i play during the mass.. and i mostly play those songs thru plucking.. i agree with the other posts.. practice.. and study scales or pentatonics and some blues.. when you play, try to incorporate some of those in the song.. remember, don't try to boast coz you'll end up with people laughing at you when you make a mistake.. try to make it a point that you use these scales in order to make the song sound and feel better and use it if you think it's appropriate.. don't shred on a song that's very solemn.. practice at home.. you need not time yourself.. you just have to practice regularly and expose yourself to different playing styles.. create your own style if you want.. pick up the guitar during your leisure time and pluck a few chord patterns.. add spice by using some scales.. not solos.. just some slight fills before changing chords will do..



thx, and im one of those person that just strum, strum, and strum. im trying to do other things, but i got few questions on ur comment.

What songs do u play?
What do u mean by plucking?
What r chord patterns?
How do u spice up by using scales?

I no this sounds so noobish, but like i sed, i only strum strum strum.
#15
it's ok.. hmm.. first of all, i have an organization in church which means we also get to be choir.. so i usually play mass songs.. sometimes we use our drums during sunday and we call it 'full band' when the choir sings with a band.. second, during our worship sessions.. so i also play worship songs.. some are acoustic type and others can be quite alternatve.. like Hillsongs, have you heard of it?.. they are really good composers of worship songs, they rock!

what i mean by plucking is that you pluck na notes out of the chord.. you don't just make a chord then pluck ehac string one by one and follow a certain beat or tempo.. what you should do is try practicing the song by playing it as if the guitar sings by itself.. like the guitar will sing for you by playing out the notes.. got it?

chord patterns are certain arrangements of chords that sound good.. example.. C-Am-F-G... and G-Em-C-D..

spice up by doing scales..before skipping from one chord to another, fill it in with some scales or slides so it would sound better, not just a simple shift from one chord to another.. remember, don't play it if you're not sure of how it will sound.. that's why you need to practice before the actual event so you will be ready..

this was how i started..you can do it too..
#16
yes, i listen to hillsongs. i like "one way jesus" "take it all" i forgot the rest.

for plucking, it would be like just picking indivual strings in a chord?

i get the chord pattern

and i play the scale before the song moves on to another song? so if the song was in the key of G, i would play the G scale?
#17
Try to learn a bit of theory; it worked wonders for me.

I think "One Way" is in B; the easiest thing to do would be to Capo 4 and transpose the chords to G shapes. I find that when playing live / for a congregation, making as little movement as possible is the best way to go so as to avoid mistakes.

As for varying the sound, try out palm mutes and maybe some thumb slaps. Hammering and arpeggiating chords help out quite a bit too.
#18
Quote by Shinoda_Ex
Try to learn a bit of theory; it worked wonders for me.

I think "One Way" is in B; the easiest thing to do would be to Capo 4 and transpose the chords to G shapes. I find that when playing live / for a congregation, making as little movement as possible is the best way to go so as to avoid mistakes.

As for varying the sound, try out palm mutes and maybe some thumb slaps. Hammering and arpeggiating chords help out quite a bit too.


thx, but what is arpeggiating chords?
#19
Quote by damole
thx, but what is arpeggiating chords?

Take any chord and ring out single notes from them; you can form a G major chord and just use the pick to hit individual strings instead of a strum.
#20
Quote by Shinoda_Ex
Take any chord and ring out single notes from them; you can form a G major chord and just use the pick to hit individual strings instead of a strum.


that is an arpeggio?