#1
ok...so ive heard of triplets, but im not exactly sure what they are or how u play them? does anyone know more about this and an example i could look at to learn how to put them in my "bag of tricks" so to speak... it would be very helfull and greatly appreciated!
#2
It's a grouping of three notes in the space of two. Most common triplets are quaver triplets, where you play three notes in the normal duration of 2 quavers.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#4
So you would count that as 1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let

As opposed to
1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and
for quavers (8ths)
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote


So you would count that as 1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let.


actually, it's 1-a-let 2-a-let 3-a-let 4-a-let.
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#6
Same ****
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#8
Quote by schecterman1990
actually, it's 1-a-let 2-a-let 3-a-let 4-a-let.
Actually, if you want to be technical, it's 1-fuck-off 2-fuck-off 3-fuck-off 4-fuck-off.


Yes, Cowboy, it is important to remember that the triplet is not the same as the gallop. The triplet should be plaued D U D U D U (1 trip let 2 trip let) over 2 beats while the gallop should be played D D U over one beat.
#9
Meh. As a long time band nerd, it bugs the hell out of me when people start going on about "WOW THE TRIPLETS IN RAINING BLOOD ARE SO HARD!".

On another note, I straight alternate pick gallops. I suck too bad I guess
#10
Quote by CowboyUp
On another note, I straight alternate pick gallops. I suck too bad I guess
Don't. It's inefficient.

You should be able to downpick 8th notes, so the D D pattern shouldn't be hard, and then the upstroke is part of the motion to get back for the next downstroke, so just hit the string.
#11
After doing it for a bit, it came pretty easily. It sounds a lot cooler also. Hmm, never too late to fix bad technique I suppose.

I still can't get it up to speed with Raining Blood though
#12
Alternate picked gallops are the most efficent way to do them, it might be possible to do them with downstrokes but they would sound too inconsistent. Raining blood and Battery are great examples, but look into strapping young lad for some crazy examples at fast tempos.
#13
Quote by hmmm_de_hum
Alternate picked gallops are the most efficent way to do them
If you're implying that you should play the gallop pattern D U D, then you are being silly. My pickings are the best for both rhythm patterns.
#14
No need to get pissy about it, im just going by how i know to do them. The motion of a standard gallop is two 16th's followed by an 8th note, and i personally find it far less strenuous to do a continuous DUD DUD DUD motion, the final quaver of each 3 note part gives sufficient time to miss an upstroke and continue with another downstroke.

Thats how i do it for speed anyway...
#16
Quote by hmmm_de_hum
No need to get pissy about it, im just going by how i know to do them. The motion of a standard gallop is two 16th's followed by an 8th note, and i personally find it far less strenuous to do a continuous DUD DUD DUD motion, the final quaver of each 3 note part gives sufficient time to miss an upstroke and continue with another downstroke.

Thats how i do it for speed anyway...

You just agreed with her.
#17
Were I to imitate the way wind players tongue, I'd pick my triplets D U D D U D (...).

Just a thought.
#18
Quote by hmmm_de_hum
No need to get pissy about it, im just going by how i know to do them. The motion of a standard gallop is two 16th's followed by an 8th note, and i personally find it far less strenuous to do a continuous DUD DUD DUD motion, the final quaver of each 3 note part gives sufficient time to miss an upstroke and continue with another downstroke.

Thats how i do it for speed anyway...



But if you were going for speed, it would be more efficient if you went DUD UDU DUD UDU, because then it would be like alternate picking, but triplets. Thats what I do at least. Before I used to do it only DUD because I thought it sounded better but now I realize theres no difference and it lets me go faster
#19
The motion of a standard gallop is two 16th's followed by an 8th note,
BGC was talking about an 8th followed by two sixteenths
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#20
The gallop is 8 16 16 and should be played D D U D D U. 16 16 8 is the reverse gallop and should be played D U D D U D.


Anyone playing fast triplets D U D D U D is being silly. It should be played D U D U D U. If you can play 2 downstrokes in a row, man up and play the whole thing with downstrokes, taking a brake with an upstroke every once in a while if you must.
#21
Whichever way you were taught to triple tongue (tu tu ku or tu ku tu ... they're just displaced of each other) is as "inefficient" as not alternate picking (double tonguing) everything

But it still is standard technique.
#22
I know nothing about triple tounging, so I don't know if you agreed or (foolishly) disagreed with me, but we're not going to promote idiotic clarinet technique.
#24
Think 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3. On every "1" it should land on the standard quarter note (or eight note if you want sextuplets.) Get a drum machine.