#1
Im now Learning scales and such, but i see that in many scales have many roots, why? is there somewhat related to intervals? what i can do with the root note and how it help me? thx in advance
#2
Um, if I'm not mistaken, the root note is the first note of the scale. For example, a major scale that starts on C has the root note C. Doesn't matter really what octave. The way it helps me is when I need to improvise a solo for jazz band. Say the chord that the 12 bar blues starts on is a B flat. I start out with a B flat as my root note and just play notes from that blues scale.
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#3
I'm no master of music theory, but here's what I can tell you:

If you have a song in A (for example) and want to solo/make somthing up/whatever, you then pick a scale and move it around until the root note is an A. ie, the A pentonic scale. If you had a song in E, then an E pentonic would work. There's more, but I wouldn't know.

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#4
the root note, as i'm sure has been said, is just the note that the scale is based around. E minor would have a root of E flat, C major would have a root of C natural, etc. the most common scale charts will usually circle the root notes and occasionally the perfect fourth or fifth.
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#5
Quote by ortrigger
E minor would have a root of E flat


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Which of themselves our minds impress;
That we can feed this mind of ours
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#8
They don't have more than one root note...? Can you give me an example of a scale with more than one root note? I'm not following you.
#9
Quote by axl611
but then why many scales have more than one root note?


They don't.
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#11
Quote by Zander155
Wat? Em has a root of E.

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#12
If you're in the key of E...some people refer to that as the Parent scale.
So the root is E

Romans are use to identify chords, I, II, V,IV...ect.
E is chord I, G# is chord III..ect

The root of the III chord is G#
The formula for a minor chord is 1,b3,5.
You start the count from the note G#


When you wanna do a lead over a chord..some people use modes.
Modes have names such as dorian..ect

The Phyrgian mode/scale is also the third mode.
The formula is 1,b2,b3,4,5,b6,b7.
The root of the mode is the third note from the parent scale

anywho,
The pentatonic minor scale is 1,b3,4,5,b7.
You can play this over different chords within the parent scale,
such as the II, III, VI chords.
You start the formula count from the root of each chord.

Theres more scales such as Double harmonics, Abrabian.
So you match up the root of whatever scales over whatever
chord you wannna play over.

In some cases i don't.lol
Last edited by Ordinary at May 20, 2008,
#13
Quote by Ordinary
If you're in the key of E...some people refer to that as the Parent scale.
So the root is E

Romans are use to identify chords, I, II, V,IV...ect.
E is chord I, A# is chord III..ect

The root of the III chord is A#
The formula for a minor chord is 1,b3,5.
You start the count from the note A#


chord III would be G#, correct?
#16
yeah..I was going to do it dorain but decide to change mode
in the middle everything.lol

thanks thou
#17
What? Switching modes would overcomplicate things and has nothing to do with this, and it wouldn't matter. For any scale that begins on E, a G note (either natural or altered in some way) is going to be your third degree, never an A note.
#18
if i was thinking in F# it would make sence.

yeah I know..but I'm trying to mix some scale becuase there's some
notes that dosn't belong or sound right over certain chords..too much tension or needs to get resovle different

Like the harmonic minor and double harmonic, becuase the second
half the scales are the same
I'm still keeping the same root thou.

It would make sence to you if you knew I recorded a backing track already.lol
Last edited by Ordinary at May 20, 2008,
#19
If you're talking SCALES, the proper term is TONIC. And it's the pitch that the scale is based around. It's where the sounds want to resolve to.

The term ROOT technically applies to harmony. You have the root of a chord. If you were in C Major, the root of the C Major chord is C, which also happens to be the Tonic of the C Major scale.
#20
The reason you think scales have more than one root is because you are looking at the patterns they make on the fretboard.

You really need to learn where the notes on the fretboard are and which notes are in key with each other.

Where you are seeing another root, it is really the same note, an octave higher.... the scale then starts again.
#21
Quote by branny1982
The reason you think scales have more than one root is because you are looking at the patterns they make on the fretboard.

You really need to learn where the notes on the fretboard are and which notes are in key with each other.

Where you are seeing another root, it is really the same note, an octave higher.... the scale then starts again.



If I remember the terms from theory class this semester correctly:

Pitch Class: A note, in no specific octave

Pitch: A note, technically in a specific octave.

As such, scales have an infinite number of roots in terms of PITCH (with relation to specific octaves), but in terms of PITCH CLASS, each scale only has one root. As Branny said, learning a little bit of theory will help this make sense.
#22
Yes,i believe it is a TONIC because in the scale books i have they say ROOT but i believe it is tonic, btw there is a NOT-Tonic notes right? the notes that you cant play first or last only like a passing note.. well, how i might use the tonic? what are they usage?