#4
thats a lot of rust dude do you live near the ocean? rust useally doesnt just happen overnight, thought rust doesnt sleep.

if the corrosion is just on the chrome or coat metal, clean it off. if its down to the base metal, sand off the rust and seal your parts either by chroming them, galvanizing them or painting them with enamel.
Why you reading this?
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I use my thumb and my johnson

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idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

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#5
Quote by plucky duck
thats a lot of rust dude do you live near the ocean? rust useally doesnt just happen overnight, thought rust doesnt sleep.

if the corrosion is just on the chrome or coat metal, clean it off. if its down to the base metal, sand off the rust and seal your parts either by chroming them, galvanizing them or painting them with enamel.


i live about 300meters away from the seashore.
and damn that rust has really slept with my guitar's hardware.
thanks dude
#6
Don't get rid of it if you ask me.
Rusty/relic looking guitars are awesome.
Signatures are overrated.
#7
You don't say what guitar it is, what value, if it's vintage, what you wanna do with it ?
#8
Are you wiping your guitar down everytime you finish playing? It may not just be the Sea air causing this. One of my friends years ago had very acidic sweat and neglected to wipe his guitar often. The end result was corroded hardware. Naptha can be used to clean some of the corrosion off but you would have to remove the hardware to do this. Once corrosion has started though you will always end up leaving some of the oxidezed metal behind (unless you buff/grind the entire finish off). If your guitar is not a vintage collectors item then corroded screws and pickup ring and pots can all be changed, see STEW MAC for replacements