#1
I've been working on a song for a few weeks now and I finally got a rough draft of it. My friend who plays guitar wanted to learn it, but he couldn't keep time with the song. So to help him I tried to tab it with ultimate guitar and I couldn't until I found out the song changes time signatures a lot. When I wrote the song it felt natural, is this normal? Also When I play it I don't notice I'm playing differently, but when I listen to the playback I can tell I'm switching time signatures. Is there a way for me to change signatures without the changes sounding so abrupt? Like make them sound a little more smooth and unsuspecting? Thanks.
#2
Well if you look at most early Metallica songs there are a lot of time changes because no one really knew a whole lot about written music except for cliff.

At any rate just practice the song more and let the transitions flow, it will come with time.
-----X <NICKY XIII> X-----
#3
well if the way u composed it was with the changes and u like it that way theres no reason to make it more unsuspecting, especially since you, yourself didn't notice it until u tabbed it out.
what u could try to do is put all the changes under one META time signature, which would encompass all or most of them
Due to recent cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off
#4
Quote by fedora bora
Is there a way for me to change signatures without the changes sounding so abrupt? Like make them sound a little more smooth and unsuspecting? Thanks.
Don't force them; let them cone naturally.


How do you get them to come naturally? You write a ton of stuff with odd time and time changes and get good at it. You'll come up with some good stuff after a while.

And sometimes you'll come up with a good lick by chance.
#6
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
I know someone will probably jump on me, but I think that reading music will help.
Rhythms, yes, but how will reading notes help?


Edit: I fully support learning to read music, but I don't want someone learning something under false pretenses.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at May 20, 2008,
#7
yea this happened to me, every now and then i'll just start playing a riff, then realise a few weeks later its in 3/4 or something

marvellous!

but anyway if you keep playing the bit over and over again then your drummer will catch on (provided he understands what to play) then when it comes to the change he'll already have the beat in his head if that makes sense

basically, practise makes perfect...

#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Rhythms, yes, but how will reading notes help?


Edit: I fully support learning to read music, but I don't want someone learning something under false pretenses.


Not so much reading notes as all all the indicators that you have changed keys or are going to. That big ole time signature change in the staff, different note values, you know.

Personally, I think knowing how to efficiently read music can help only help.

You can play songs youve never heard
It makes it easier to make a career in music (unless your in a rock band or something, then it helps for other reasons)
Its an excellent way to communicate rhythmic and harmonic ideas.
It makes you appear more professional

The list goes on.
Last edited by zeppelinfreak51 at May 20, 2008,