#1
Learning all the notes on the fretboard? For example learning what fret on what string plays what note. Or should I learn some more scales instead? What do you think would be better? I'm a bit of a beginner and don't know much theory.
You are like a hurricane
There's calm in your eye.
And I'm gettin' blown away
To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
I want to love you but
I'm getting blown away.
#2
Learn the notes on the fretboard, then learn the intervals that make up different scales. Scale patterns can be helpful but are also rather limited as far as I'm concerned.
Ka pu te ruha ka hao te rangatahi.
#3
Learn both, there's no hurry (I assume).

You don't necessarily have to learn every note on the fretboard as long as you understand scales, but for finding chord root notes it is EXTREMELY helpful to learn all the notes on the low E and A strings.
#4
Try this one - is it worth learning the alphabet if you want to learn to read and write? You can't actually learn scales until you learn the notes anyway.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
it's worth it becuase you'll be able change the shape of the scales
you're learning.

You'll also will be able to change the shape of a chords or make
veriations of the same chord or inversions of it
When extending chords it'll be very helpful.

The same note on paper will give you a different tone
if you play it on a different string.

You know...there's only 5 notes to the pentanic scale, but
you can play that 5 notes in different places of the fretbroad
#6
Learn it.

A good way to learn all the notes on the fretboard is to lean all the mode patterns and memorise the major key (E Phrygian I think). After that, all you need to do is learn where all the BC's and EF's are and you should be able to know where all the notes are.

Once you know the notes on the fretboard, all you need to do is memorise intervals and since you know all or most of the notes, you should be able to change scale shapes and box patterns easily.....I hope....
#7
Quote by Ordinary
it's worth it becuase you'll be able change the shape of the scales
you're learning.

You'll also will be able to change the shape of a chords or make
veriations of the same chord or inversions of it
When extending chords it'll be very helpful.

The same note on paper will give you a different tone
if you play it on a different string.

You know...there's only 5 notes to the pentanic scale, but
you can play that 5 notes in different places of the fretbroad


to add...to this wealth of information...

Sometimes of you are playing with other instruments...you may be
in the on a C-chord..but if you are playing the wrong C-chord that
can be bad..

Another cool thing you can do is make up a lick..then play the same
lick in a totally different interval..like 4ths..or 5ths..
then layer them...it can sound totally awesome..I remember when i
discovered this technique when...um..come to think of it...Heavy Metal
has been using this for over 20 years...They may borrowed it from
Classical Music from 100's of years ago..

No matter how much of a sophisticated know it all emo-kid..or vain prettyboy..
or hillbilly..or badazz..it all comes back to the basics..No matter what they look
like..they read books....books on theory..and some seek the finest instructors
in the world to teach them..
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
#8
Okay, thanks for all the responses guys. I'll learn all of the notes on the fretboard then I'll start on scales since knowing the notes should hopefully give me a good background to the scales.
You are like a hurricane
There's calm in your eye.
And I'm gettin' blown away
To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
I want to love you but
I'm getting blown away.
#10
The way I learned all of the notes on the fretboard, this may or may not help you, is to learn all of the notes in C major on on the fretboard. This helped me learn all of the notes in a day or two and that way if you know your circle of fifths, or keys in general, it is incredibly easy to find the new notes because you only have to change a couple of notes. That's really just my attempt at helping.
SPAM
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Duncan Distortion (regular spaced) FS

Looking for: an acoustic, recording gear, or $
#11
Quote by estranged_g_n_r
Learning all the notes on the fretboard? For example learning what fret on what string plays what note. Or should I learn some more scales instead

Yes, learn all the notes. If you don't know them, I'm willing to bet you know the scale patterns and not the scales themselves.
#12
Quote by FFFDFEFRFKFFF
The way I learned all of the notes on the fretboard, this may or may not help you, is to learn all of the notes in C major on on the fretboard. This helped me learn all of the notes in a day or two and that way if you know your circle of fifths, or keys in general, it is incredibly easy to find the new notes because you only have to change a couple of notes. That's really just my attempt at helping.

Yup, good method, I did the exact same thing, just through A minor scales. Name the notes as you play them. It helps more than you think.
#13
Although I would recommend that you do so, I have not yet learnt all the notes, if you like, I instead learnt each scale all over the fretboard, through modes. So If I'm soloing in E minor, I can play it at the 7th fret in the scale shape that would be B Phrygian - instead, however, I ensure to emphasise the E and think of the intervals as relating to the E minor.
#15
If you just learn scales without learning what notes you're playing, you will not be able to do as much with them as you could if you did. You'll just know scale patterns, which, while great, are a million times better when you know which note/scale degree/etc. is which. But definitely don't think you have to decide between notes and scales. Figuring out the notes to the scale patterns as you go along is a great way to pick up both.
#16
Quote by Phobos&Deimos
If you want to be a musician, then learn the notes. Any moron can read tablature.


Yeah, I thought that too myself whilst learning some tabs so decided to learn some theory. I figured learning the notes on the fretboard would be a good place to start, so I'm going to do that. Thanks for all the positive response guys.
You are like a hurricane
There's calm in your eye.
And I'm gettin' blown away
To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
I want to love you but
I'm getting blown away.