#1
I have two guitars with exaclty the same brand of strings. One is a fender and the other is a knockoff....For some reason when Im bending a string on a fender guitar I feel alot more resistance and tension than I do when Im bending the knockoff. Both guitars stay in tune.

What could be the reason that is making the strings hard on the fender?
#3
Flatter Frets on the Fender?

Play a Cort ?

Play with V-Picks ?

Every minute is to be Grasped........................................................................Time waits for nobody.

#4
i think im using .09 gauge. Im not sure.....its the fender super bullets.

You mean the action of my guitar could be too high?

Im not sure about the flatter frets...how do I check?
#7
Quote by harkkam
i think im using .09 gauge. Im not sure.....its the fender super bullets.

You mean the action of my guitar could be too high?

Im not sure about the flatter frets...how do I check?


well compare them see if there is a visible difference between the two
#8
It's probably the scale length. Fender uses a 25.5" scale on most models, but alot of manufacturers commonly use shorter scale lengths. The longer a string is, the more tension will be required to reach the same tuning. That's the main reason bass guitars have such a long scale length. It's either that, or use ridiculously large bass strings to get a usable amount of tension. I usually use 10s on my Fenders, and 11s on my Epiphone Sheraton for this reason.

edit: Almost forgot, another thing to consider is dead string length. That is, the amount of string running behind the nut and past the saddles. Basically, the entire length of the string, from ball ends to the tuners contributes to string tension. Strats have 6 inline tuners spread out across the headstock, so coupled with a 25.5" scale, they have quite a noticeably higher tension than most normal scale Gibsons, Epiphones or Ibanez models.
Last edited by Stickymongoose at Sep 21, 2008,