#1
Hey all, I got a Jackson RR24 a while ago, which has a Floyd Rose locking tremolo, which is something I've never used until buying this guitar.

Anyway, I've just snapped my A string and have no idea how to restring it!

Could anyone tell me how or suggest any good links? I've got band practise on Friday and really need to get this sorted!

Thanks!

Drew
Jackson, Peavey, Line 6 <3
#3
Thanks. Does it matter what gauge string I use? Because at the moment I'm not sure what gauge I have on as it's just the strings it came with.
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#4
most jacksons come with a 9-42 string set.

restringing the floyd does take a little time to get use to. but once you get it down its simple.

its easier if you put something under the trem so it dosnet go down much. after that unlock your locking nut. then detune the a string. unlock the a string. if its a original style floyd its in the back if its a low pro style they will be on the top. put the new string in, give it some tension. take out the thing you put under the trem so it didnt go down that much. and tune the a string. it will take time till the string is broken in so you will have to streatch the string some and tune it over and over.

after you do this a few time, you will get the hang of it and once you have it set up right you will be one of the few that wont hate floy rose trems or think they are a pain in the ass.
#5
Thanks. I'll look around and see if I have any 9-42 sets lying about. If not, would it matter if I put a slightly thicker gauge on for now?
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#6
Quote by NetherSpirit
Thanks. I'll look around and see if I have any 9-42 sets lying about. If not, would it matter if I put a slightly thicker gauge on for now?


Yes it will.

Trems are based on the tension created by the strings, which are pulling the trem upwards, and the springs at the back, which are pulling the trem down (into the cavity). If you put strings of a larger gauge on, the tension of the strings will increase causing the trem to pull upwards. You want a trem parallel to the body because that's where tuning stability is best at.

Just replace all the strings with a brand new 9 - 42 gauge set.
#7
Ah ok! I'll get a couple of 9-42 sets tomorrow. I guess I'll just have to use my Samick today, lol.
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#8
Just a few hints in restringing your guitar....

- Put a battery or a block of wood in the cavity to stop your trem from sinking. Makes it much easier to access the trem nuts and bolts etc. for strings.

- Keep the trem arm in the socket. Means you can get the battery easily by diving it, and pulling out the battery to ensure your trem is parallel.

- Change one string at a time. If you want to clean the fretboard, take them all off.

- Stretch the **** out of your strings before locking the strings at the nut. Trust me, the amount of noobs that go "0mfgz my trem is not stayin in tun" is due to unstretched strings going out of tune and readjusting to the tension. To stretch, just use lots of bends with huge vibrato, and keep playing it until it stays in tune without falling a step or something.

- Also, reset all your fine tuners to a middle position.
#9
So, to restring it, I undo the nut, wind the string off the machine head, open up the back of the guitar, set the fine tuner to middle position, then what? I don't get it from there.
Jackson, Peavey, Line 6 <3
#10
Well, here's how I'd go about it...

1) Unlock the nut
2) Place battery in cavity

FOR EACH STRING

3) Undo string at machinehead and remove it
4) Unlock clamp at bridge
5) Reset fine tuners to middle / neutral position
6) Get new replacement string, cut off ball end and place the cut end into bridge clamp
7) Lock bridge clamp
8) Slot string machinehead (make sure it's under string retainer) and start tuning up

REPEAT

9) *Tune all strings to desired tuning (if you are going to be in a different tuning from the one before, you must re adjust the springs at the back)
10) Stretch strings
11) Lock strings at nut
11) Retune using fine tuners

*A good way to tune up is to use cross tuning, where you tune like this...

E string -> A string -> E string -> A string -> D string -> E string -> A string -> D string -> G string etc. etc.

EDIT: Also, you don't need to open the back to find the fine tuners, they should be located at the back of the trem. Behind the back panel is the springs.
Last edited by Mwoit at May 21, 2008,
#11
acualy you can use a different guage, seeing as you havent set up a guitar with a floyd i would try it yourself. go to your guitar show you go to and ask if someone there can show you how to do it. that way when you deside to switch them again later on you will know how.
#12
There's absolutely no need to block the bridge if you're using the same gauge, that'll actually complicate matters - just replace your missing A string first and bring it to pitch, that should give you a level bridge once it's in tune and all the other strings should be back to the correct tension and also in tune. From then just replace the other strings one at a time, starting with the low E.
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Last edited by steven seagull at May 21, 2008,
#14
Quote by NetherSpirit
So, to restring it, I undo the nut, wind the string off the machine head, open up the back of the guitar, set the fine tuner to middle position, then what? I don't get it from there.

open the back of the guitar for fine tuners????

Ok listen:

Block the trem with anything u can find that will put the trem parallel to the body of the guitar. (this means put something in the routed hole under the trem).

remove all the strings by unlocking the upper nut (remove the screws and blocks for ease of replacing strings) and unwinding the tuners till the strings slack. Then unscrew the string holders from the allan keys facing the bottom of the guitar.

Some people(like me) feed the strings thru the tuners leaving the ball ends at the tuners to hold them in. Then cut each string LONGER than the distance to the entrance on the trem. Insert each string into the slots in the trem and tighten down well.

start to tune. Keep in mind the trem wants to be parallel to the body. This is where floyd frustration begins. At first this is a real pain in the arse, but after a while you get used to it and it become easy. You will probably have to go back and forth tuning about 5-10 time to get it right. If you are in tune and the trem is diving into the cavity or flying out of the cavity you must adjust the screws that hold the trem claw into the body. This is a balancing act and will also take some time.

Once the trem is parallel and the ax is in tune stretch the strings like hell. Then set the fine tuners to the middle (these are the little thumbwheels at the bottom of the trem) and finally screw the locking nut down.

Dont give up, its worth it (IMHO) once you get the process down. I do it in a bout 20min start to Play.

Good luck
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#15
Quote by fuzzyDXMG
open the back of the guitar for fine tuners????

Ok listen:

Block the trem with anything u can find that will put the trem parallel to the body of the guitar. (this means put something in the routed hole under the trem).

remove all the strings by unlocking the upper nut (remove the screws and blocks for ease of replacing strings) and unwinding the tuners till the strings slack. Then unscrew the string holders from the allan keys facing the bottom of the guitar.

...

Good luck

No, no, no, no, no!

Blocking the bridge isn' necessary either.
Actually called Mark!

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#16
Quote by NetherSpirit
Thanks. I'll look around and see if I have any 9-42 sets lying about. If not, would it matter if I put a slightly thicker gauge on for now?


you can only go one gauge higher, and that wont usually affect your bridge.

When you do change the strings, put a wooden block or something under the bridge so it doesnt move from the spot it's in. then replace the strings ONE AT A TIME. when all of the strings are on your bridge should be set. unless it moved, you'll need to balance the spring tension with the string tension via the springs in back or the screws leading to the springs. and this is a PAIN IN THE ASS. So i'd say stick with the same gauge, then after practice mess with it and set up your new strings.
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#17
Quote by steven seagull
No, no, no, no, no!

Blocking the bridge isn' necessary either.


but it makes it easier. unless you want him to do it the 1 string at a time hard way.
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#18
Quote by tommyp484
but it makes it easier. unless you want him to do it the 1 string at a time hard way.


'The hard way' in this case gives better results though.
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#19
If i know my physics (and i do) removing all the strings at the same time isnt the best of ideas
theres a lot of tension there (way more than you think) and suddenly releasing it all could cause all sorts of neck trouble (Not saying it will) but if theres a proper way to do something its one string at a time
Shut up and play your guitar!
#20
Quote by tommyp484
but it makes it easier. unless you want him to do it the 1 string at a time hard way.

No it doesn't, and where'd you get the daft idea that removing one string at a time way is harder anyway? It's a damnsight easier and takes about 1/4 of the time.

Take off one string, and you remove x amount of tension from the overall string tension. Spring tension remains constant.

Replace that string and bring to pitch, as it reaches the correct tension and therefore pitch all the other strings will gradually approach the pitches they were at previously. When the replaced string is in tune all the other ones will be too. Repeat with other strings, no blocking required, no touching the other strings and no messing with the springs.

If you block the bridge you achieve nothing really, your ultimate aim is to balance the string tension with srping tension remember? If you block the bridge and remove all the strings when you re-string you're not balancing with the spring tension, you're balancing with what's effectively a fixed bridge so when you remove the block everthing's going to go back out of tune anyway. As far as re-stringing a floyd from scratch goes, you're giving yourself 6 individual sources of tension that all need to be at different values and all affect each other when you adjust them.

The only time you'd remove all the strings is if you're doing something like replacing pickups.
Actually called Mark!

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#22
Quote by steven seagull
No it doesn't, and where'd you get the daft idea that removing one string at a time way is harder anyway? It's a damnsight easier and takes about 1/4 of the time.

Take off one string, and you remove x amount of tension from the overall string tension. Spring tension remains constant.

Replace that string and bring to pitch, as it reaches the correct tension and therefore pitch all the other strings will gradually approach the pitches they were at previously. When the replaced string is in tune all the other ones will be too. Repeat with other strings, no blocking required, no touching the other strings and no messing with the springs.

If you block the bridge you achieve nothing really, your ultimate aim is to balance the string tension with srping tension remember? If you block the bridge and remove all the strings when you re-string you're not balancing with the spring tension, you're balancing with what's effectively a fixed bridge so when you remove the block everthing's going to go back out of tune anyway. As far as re-stringing a floyd from scratch goes, you're giving yourself 6 individual sources of tension that all need to be at different values and all affect each other when you adjust them.

The only time you'd remove all the strings is if you're doing something like replacing pickups.


yeah that makes sense.
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