#1
ok so heres my deal...i've been reading various pages of this thread...and now have some questions of my own...

firstly i have a 50W amp...it has a 12" speaker...the speaker extension out cuts the speaker...and is to be used for 8ohm...

what i want to do is add warmer texture/sound with a 2x12 cabinet (4x12 is too big for what i want)...but keeping this in mind, i also want to ensure i get the same or greater volume without worrying about blowing up my amp...

is it better to use 2-16ohm speakers wired in parallel, or 2-4ohms in series?

now assuming i am to use 30W speakers, how does hooking them up in parallel differ in sound than hooking them up in series? does the wattage add up in series, and stay the same in parallel, how does it work? i want to ensure that i don't blow my amp up, yet get the ultimate sound and volume from it...also...would this mean i need bigger output speakers than 30W?

doing further reading through the thread and various others, as i play hard rock i want to keep a closed back, which adds some thump to it all correct?

and lastly, i think, i read elsewhere in this thread that someone wanted to know if a sub-woofer box would work as a cabinet...i didn't see an answer...could i take a pre-fab'd sub-box for a car built for 12" woofers and use it for a cabinet?

thx in advance
#2
Quote by sweet_inc
ok so heres my deal...i've been reading various pages of this thread...and now have some questions of my own...

firstly i have a 50W amp...it has a 12" speaker...the speaker extension out cuts the speaker...and is to be used for 8ohm...

what i want to do is add warmer texture/sound with a 2x12 cabinet (4x12 is too big for what i want)...but keeping this in mind, i also want to ensure i get the same or greater volume without worrying about blowing up my amp...

is it better to use 2-16ohm speakers wired in parallel, or 2-4ohms in series?
It doesn't matter. Both will be the same.

Quote by sweet_inc
now assuming i am to use 30W speakers, how does hooking them up in parallel differ in sound than hooking them up in series?
it doesn't matter both will be the same.

Quote by sweet_inc
does the wattage add up in series, and stay the same in parallel, how does it work?
NO. Power capacity will add in series and add in parallel.

Quote by sweet_inc
i want to ensure that i don't blow my amp up, yet get the ultimate sound and volume from it...also...would this mean i need bigger output speakers than 30W?
two 30W speakers will give you a power handling capacity of 60W. I prefer to have more margin than that. But that's my preference.

Power handling capacity does nothing to tell you how much volume you'll get out of the speakers for a given amount of power. Look for the efficiency rating. You'll see a number followed by dB/1watt/1meter the higher the number, the louder the speaker.

Quote by sweet_inc
doing further reading through the thread and various others, as i play hard rock i want to keep a closed back, which adds some thump to it all correct?
No. a sealed cabinet keeps the backwave from mixing with the frontwave. it also restricts cone movement. it depends on the suspension of the speaker whether the open back or sealed cab will give you better low frequency response. use the recommendations from the speaker manufacturer when deciding which to use for the speakers you choose.

Quote by sweet_inc
and lastly, i think, i read elsewhere in this thread that someone wanted to know if a sub-woofer box would work as a cabinet...i didn't see an answer...could i take a pre-fab'd sub-box for a car built for 12" woofers and use it for a cabinet?

thx in advance
it depends on the box. some boxes are made as acoustic low pass filters. the speakers are inside and you can't see them, or they have plexi panels in front of them. the sound comes through ducts. you won't get much mids or highs through a cabinet like that. It will sound awful with a guitar.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.