#1
When playing an electric guitar, around the bridge sort of area there are various things for changing the intonation and string height and such like. Why don't acoustic guitars have things for changing the intonation? Surely they suffer the same problem?

And if it isn't really necessary - why is it on electics?
#2
there is indeed a adjustable bridge system on acoustic guitars. Gibsons to be specific. but you see... the problem is that they're CRAP.

in order to have an adjustable bridge system, you require some heavier duty parts. Gibson made theirs out of metal. this hindered the vibration of the top of the guitar greatly, killing off some of the guitars tone. in the world of acoustic guitars where tone is everything, it's just a plain nono. nonono

for an electric guitar its quite practical to put on an adjustable bridge without any problems. The guitar is built solidly enough for a little bit of extra weight not to matter.

The idea of an adjustable bridge is a good one. there's no question about that. the problem is that it just doesnt work practically. tone is basically everything to acoustic guitars.
#3
Quote by captivate
there is indeed a adjustable bridge system on acoustic guitars. Gibsons to be specific. but you see... the problem is that they're CRAP.

in order to have an adjustable bridge system, you require some heavier duty parts. Gibson made theirs out of metal. this hindered the vibration of the top of the guitar greatly, killing off some of the guitars tone. in the world of acoustic guitars where tone is everything, it's just a plain nono. nonono

The idea of an adjustable bridge is a good one. there's no question about that. the problem is that it just doesnt work practically. tone is basically everything to acoustic guitars.

It's impossible for an acoustic. Raising and lowering the saddle, regardless of the metal pins, kills the contact of the saddle to the bridge. Therein lies the problem (not to mention, those extra parts dampen the soundboard like a mute).
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#6
ive read that article - its very interesting actually, but seems at odds with most of the guitar worlds thinking. normally in electric guitars there is some idea that a heavy brass bridge will sustain very well - whereas it seems to be completely false in this situation
#7
You need to remember a fundamental difference between the electric guitar and the acoustic guitar. With the acoustic, the string's vibrating energy needs to be transferred into the body of the guitar so that it can be expressed back out again through the soundhole. With the electric, the string's vibrating energy simply needs to be present so that the magnetic field from the pickup can do it's thing. A heavy brass bridge helps sustain on an electric because it tends to help the string to keep on vibrating. Sort of like it stops the vibrations from extending beyond the point where the string contacts the saddle. As long as the string is vibrating above the pole pieces of the pickups, the electric should make sound. Same thing with the acoustic, as long as the string is vibrating the guitar should make sound. But how much of that vibrating energy is being transferred to the interior of the acoustic? That's the major difference.
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
But how much of that vibrating energy is being transferred to the interior of the acoustic? That's the major difference.


That's why an adjustable bridge doesnt work on an acoustic. The actual vibrating energy of the string itself isnt enough for an acoustic. The top of the guitar must also resonate to project sound. Hence, the lighter the top, the better it resonates.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.