#1
So I'm writing a song, and it's supposed to be sounding darkihs or really heavy, and I've been using the Am Scale and G major, but it sounds too "blues-ish", and I was wondering if anyone could give me a really heavy or dark sounding scale?
#2
A lot of it will depend on the harmonic context; you could really get any scale to work. Fool around with the harmonic minor though. It's 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 if you didn't know.
#3
Quote by :-D
A lot of it will depend on the harmonic context; you could really get any scale to work. Fool around with the harmonic minor though. It's 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 if you didn't know.


Id agree, except I know that when I play the harmonic minor, I always accidentally turn it into an Egyptian song...no matter what I do. So if your NOT like me, then go for it. I guess Im just complaining really.

For dark and desperate sounds Id say phygrian and dorian.
#4
definitely the harmonic minor.

do you know modes? if not, learn them. There are 3 minor modes and one diminished. Diminished sounds really freaky and bad in a good way.
#5
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Id agree, except I know that when I play the harmonic minor, I always accidentally turn it into an Egyptian song...no matter what I do. So if your NOT like me, then go for it. I guess Im just complaining really.

Are you playing it over V7 chords? If so then you're playing Phrygian Dominant, which is a very exotic/Egyptian sounding scale.
Last edited by :-D at May 21, 2008,
#6
Quote by :-D
A lot of it will depend on the harmonic context; you could really get any scale to work. Fool around with the harmonic minor though. It's 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 if you didn't know.



I agree, the harmonic minor scale is an evil sounding scale....it should work for you.
#7
You probably want a diminished sound. It's not quite a scale or a mode. All intervals are in 3rds, somewhat overused sometimes though in some more modern metal bands which will remain nameless.
#9
Quote by robshredsky
You probably want a diminished sound. It's not quite a scale or a mode.

There are certainly diminished scales, and the Locrian mode has a diminished tonic chord. Other diminished modes include Aeolian b5, the altered scale and Locrian #6.
#10
All in the phrasing. A good starting point, however, would be harmonic minor, one of its modes or other alterations, maybe diminished.
#13
Quote by RedDeath9
Try the half-whole and whole-half scale, byzantine scale, diminished perhaps.

Just for clarification, the half-whole and whole-half are both diminished scales.

Awesome avatar too.
#15
all these answers are perfectly acceptable to your question and i have nothing against attempting to write a song by first finding scale/key, but i find most success in this by simply playing some power chords preferably in a drop tuning (especially when i want it to be heavy), and just "going at it" and messing around with a bunch of stuff. but for my input for your question, to keep it simple and not try to be too "exotic" try just aeolian, that'll work just fine
#16
Quote by mattrsg1
all these answers are perfectly acceptable to your question and i have nothing against attempting to write a song by first finding scale/key, but i find most success in this by simply playing some power chords preferably in a drop tuning (especially when i want it to be heavy), and just "going at it" and messing around with a bunch of stuff. but for my input for your question, to keep it simple and not try to be too "exotic" try just aeolian, that'll work just fine


Thanks for the contributions everyone. So far, I have been using the C harmonic minor scale its been working good. I have power chords playing through the song, but the lead guitar is doing these riffs and fills, during and between the chord sequences, and I needed to learn a better scale that is heavy enough to fit the part.
#17
The harmonic context will determine the "heavyess", not the scale. If you want to use C harmonic minor, try tuning to drop C for example. Play the open low C power chord (bottom 2 or 3 strings) and throw the leads on top of that, you'll come much closer to your desired heavy sound.
#18
Quote by :-D
The harmonic context will determine the "heavyess", not the scale. If you want to use C harmonic minor, try tuning to drop C for example. Play the open low C power chord (bottom 2 or 3 strings) and throw the leads on top of that, you'll come much closer to your desired heavy sound.
+1

I dont think people should be suggesting scales. If you want to sound dark; learn how to use dissonance, proper phrasing and melodic/harmonic intervals.
Like playing b5's over minor chords sounds pretty dark. So does m6's over major chords. Or moving around melodically by b5's will also sound dark.
#19
^Well said; as a general rule, TS, for any specific sound it's more about the phrasing and intervals you play (be they in or out of the key/scale) than the scale you pick. There's no scale that will automatically give you a specific sound without taking the harmony into consideration.
#20
Quote by :-D
^Well said; as a general rule, TS, for any specific sound it's more about the phrasing and intervals you play (be they in or out of the key/scale) than the scale you pick. There's no scale that will automatically give you a specific sound without taking the harmony into consideration.
But than what should we suggest to people who are obviously not up to the stage where they can think about phrasing, harmonic/melodic dissonance and intervals?
#21
Quote by demonofthenight
But than what should we suggest to people who are obviously not up to the stage where they can think about phrasing, harmonic/melodic dissonance and intervals?
Scales so they can explore that stuff themselves. At least IMO.
#22
Quote by grampastumpy
Scales so they can explore that stuff themselves. At least IMO.
But this gives them the magical scale belief. As in, this magical scale will make me magically sound like this, no matter what/how I play. There are no magical scales kids...
#23
Quote by demonofthenight
But this gives them the magical scale belief. As in, this magical scale will make me magically sound like this, no matter what/how I play. There are no magical scales kids...
Not as long as we're around since we always tell them they don't. Plus they're bound to figure it out eventually themselves.
#24
Try adding some chorus and reverb to darken your sound, along with the harmonic minor scale, It will sound KILLER!!!
#25
Look all you want for the perfect scale, but it's not what notes are in the scale, it's how you use them. For example, playing minor pentatonic stuff, especially roots and flat 3rds, will naturally sound more hard rock than dark metal. If you use notes that sound more tense, you'll get a darker sound (bending notes slightly sharp also creates nice tension). Flat 6ths, flat 2nds, sharp 4ths, major 7ths (gives you that harmonic minor sound) all work great, especially if you incorporate a lot of semi-tone steps (worked great for Jaws), but once again, it's all about using them appropriately. We could give you a million suggestions on scales, chords, techniques etc. but it won't make you write a great lead/solo.
#27
These nothing wrong with Am and Em is a great scale too. Work on phrasing and intervals. Really -D was right this time. Now I think this was a serious bump and the original poster has long moved on. Tell Jet to lock this one.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#28
^Good ol' sensible Ron.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp