#1
So, I've been doing quite a lot of home recording lately, and although I can get decent tone through my mic for light distortion and lead parts, the heavier stuff gets ridiculous sounding. I can't even record RHCP style distortion without it getting ridiculously tinny and bassy with no mids. And yes, my EQ does not have scooped mids

I'm using a Behringer condenser mic through a small mixing desk of the same brand, and then a firewire interface which is also behringer.

Is my problem placement, processing, or is it (as I am beginning to think) simply the wrong mic?

Thanks for any help.

p.s Yes formatting lol.
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#2
try a 57

I use a sure 57, but those can get pretty price heavy. Just get a less expensive brand.

but a 57 works the best for recording guitar for me.

hope this helps
#3
Which Behringer condenser are you using?
Where are you placing the mic?
And what kind of room are you in? (bedroom, garage, empty room etc)

In general for recording guitars via mic you'll want to be using something like the ol' SM57, if you cant afford that grab a PG48, they're about half the price, but still better than something you'll get from the B boys...
#4
Well, I haven't used that particular microphone, so I can't comment on it's performance. Make sure you have experimented with all different types of placement : for example, distance, on/off axis. Also, try turning the gain down, if it's on full, as you don't generally need as much gain when recording.

You might also be able to improve the sound with processing. Try using an EQ plugin to boost the parts of the sound you're missing. Experimenting with EQ can give some great results. You could also fatten the sound with double tracking.

If nothing else works, then yes, it could be the microphone by all means, but I think you'll be able to get it sounding at least a bit better with EQ and such.
There is poetry in despair.
#5
^I am able to EQ and add processing, but to get it to sound anywhere near good I have to make it sound unbelievably processed. I can't EQ what's not there, you know what I mean?

The mic is from this set :

http://www.behringer.com/PODCASTUDIO-FIREWIRE/

I'm positioning it close to the right speaker, on the outer of the cone.
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#6
Also, I've been trying to teach myself how to do this, what is the effective way to double tracks?

When I do it (by playing it in again) it sounds like a wierd chorus effect.
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#7
Righto, your positioning is right, so the main problem there is you're using and ambient, condenser mic (meant for vocals, used mostly to pick up every nuance of the voice) when a dynamic mic should be in place (more direct sound feed). Where the condenser will break up and sound pathetic e.g tinny, thin etc. The dynamic mic will pic up the sound only from the amp so pretty much exactly what comes out of the amp is what gets recorded.

So sadly my friend you're gonna have to invest in a good instrument condenser like those i described in my earlier post.

And i guess the ol' EQ solution is out the window which is fair enough.

As far as double tracking, copy and paste is the easiest but slightly less organic approach. But sadly, again, if you're not playing with a metronome it's gonna take 100% precision in your playing to double track effectively. The chorus-ish effect you're getting now is the result of the 2nd track being ever so slightly in front/behind the original.

So in summary,

Instrument condenser Shure 57/47
And metronome/copy and paste
#8
Quote by Shredder XXX
Righto, your positioning is right, so the main problem there is you're using and ambient, condenser mic (meant for vocals, used mostly to pick up every nuance of the voice) when a dynamic mic should be in place (more direct sound feed). Where the condenser will break up and sound pathetic e.g tinny, thin etc. The dynamic mic will pic up the sound only from the amp so pretty much exactly what comes out of the amp is what gets recorded.

So sadly my friend you're gonna have to invest in a good instrument condenser like those i described in my earlier post.

And i guess the ol' EQ solution is out the window which is fair enough.

As far as double tracking, copy and paste is the easiest but slightly less organic approach. But sadly, again, if you're not playing with a metronome it's gonna take 100% precision in your playing to double track effectively. The chorus-ish effect you're getting now is the result of the 2nd track being ever so slightly in front/behind the original.

So in summary,

Instrument condenser Shure 57/47
And metronome/copy and paste


Excellent, thanks man. I actually re-play the track in again (so like 2 seperate tracks of me playing the same thing), and I do use a metronome, so maybe varying the sound would be a good option? Thanks.
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