#1
Alright, theres probably topics about this on here but I need help. I don't really understand the software (or hardware) involved in lining the guitar straight into the computer. I've read about people doing it on here, but I'd like for you all to show me examples of what your using, and more specifically give me links to places online where I could be a line in. Also, how much are they generally priced? I want a good one but not too expensive.
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#2
look at the stickies, theres the UG video which talking about this a little.

Basically they are DIing directing to their mic port from the guitar.
some people have luck with it working, others are not so happy with the outcome.

Run a guitar cable to a TS 1/4 - 1/8" adapter and plug into your computer's pink mic input port.
Run Audacity set to record to that mic port.

A much better way would be to get an audio interface such as the line6 Toneports or m-audio Fast Track USB. Be aware that the Gearbox software isnt great for heavy distortion type tones...
#3
Simple. Go to radio shack. Get a chord with a male 1/8 inch going to a 1/4 inch female. Plug it into the "line in" input on the back of your computer. Now you have an extension chord. While you're at radio shack, buy one of their purple stereo 1/4 inch cables. Get a multi effect ( I use a DigiTech RP50 ($49.00)) that has amp modeling. Plug your guitar into the input of that unit. Plug the purple cable into the output of the multi effect and the other end into the female extension chord that goes to your line in. You should hear your playing now. Adjust your level on either your computer's volume control or on the multieffect to get it to sound like you think is right.

To record it (if you have something that records in your system)
Go to your computers 'volume' control panel. Go to 'options'. Click 'properties'. Click 'recording'. Select 'line in'. You should be good to go with your recording software (which may have it's own settings).
#4
^That will work, but won't be the best quality, and you will probably get quite bad latency (lagging/delay)
There is poetry in despair.
#5
^Nah, I get real good quality, no lag. I call it my fifth amp.

Not to be self-promoing, but in my profile 'Down on You' and 'Strange' were both recorded recently with that setup. If the quality ain't there, let me know.
Last edited by Badorphan at May 28, 2008,
#6
Some people drop on lucky with their stock soundcard. Most people, however , don't, and do experience latency and poor quality.
There is poetry in despair.
#8
I record with a 1/4 to 1/8 adapter and I get very very low latency. A few of the tracks on my profile where recorded like that. It will always be better to use a proper audio soundcard and an interface though. You can get more professional results.

If you're new to home recording though the adapter is a very cheap and easy way to start. When you get better at it then you can splash out on decent equipment, even micing your amp