#1
So you think you know how to read music? I want to learn how. What ways did you learn how to read music? Strategies, instruments, any recommended methods? How long did it take you to get to your level of fluency?
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#2
Make flashcards with each note on the staff. Use that, if you want more theory than just being able to read music pick up the idiot guide to music theory. Its a great book
#3
Quote by stratplyr01
So you think you know how to read music? I want to learn how. What ways did you learn how to read music? Strategies, instruments, any recommended methods? How long did it take you to get to your level of fluency?
Maybe all it takes is practice. Pick a couple of simple songs and play them.

And dont forget Every good boy deserves fruit and FACE either
#4
If you actually want to learn how to read it, one important thing you need to realize if you want to be able to read anything besides C Major/A Minor sheet music is to read it as intervals not notes. If you learn it as notes, then every single time a different key (really common) or mode other than major and minor (not as common, but also not that uncommon either), you would have to learn every single line and space as a different note, while it is a much more straight forward change if you are just looking at it as intervals.
#6
Quote by Matheau
If you actually want to learn how to read it, one important thing you need to realize if you want to be able to read anything besides C Major/A Minor sheet music is to read it as intervals not notes. If you learn it as notes, then every single time a different key (really common) or mode other than major and minor (not as common, but also not that uncommon either), you would have to learn every single line and space as a different note, while it is a much more straight forward change if you are just looking at it as intervals.
Would that work well with music that has alot of non-diatonic notes in it?
#7
Quote by demonofthenight

And dont forget Every good boy deserves fudge and FACE either

Fixed
#8
Mainly sight read pieces. Maybe play them a couple of times to get it right but when you're done just go straight on to a new piece. This is because once you know a song you're not really using the music much so it's by always sight reading you'll learn the notes a lot faster than just repeatedly playing one or two pieces.

Go to your music shop and get a few begginer classical books. Classical probably better because shops don't usually have begginer rock books with just standard notation (well my local store doesn't), they usually just have band guitar books. Also, begginer classical pieces all sound good when you play them right (instead of really dissonant metal or something) so it's easy to tell if you're playing it wrong.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at May 22, 2008,
#9
Well before I played guitar, I took trumpet for 2 years, and piano for 5.
The piano really helped me get to where I am today, for example: 3 weeks ago I sight read the song "He's a Pirate".

Honestly, if you really want to get to a high level of music reading, you should either take piano or classical guitar.
Well shit man.
#10
start with simple pieces, like "twinkle twinkle little star" things that you would learn on guitar in your first weeks of learning. take these super simple songs and read and play them at the same time. work your way up once you start getting a little comfortable with it. i'm personally am not very good at sight reading and playing but this is how i got started.
#11
A good rule of them is to start on the first line of the treble clef, and that is your middle C. From there, the space above it is D, the line above that space is E, the space above that is F and so on and so forth.
Well shit man.
#12
Quote by demonofthenight
And dont forget Every good boy does fine and FACE either


doubly fixed. but also, learning the intervals is the way to go, that's the way I'm leaning towards and it has helped my sight reading ability greatly. also, just play as many pieces as you can.
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#13
Okay, so how do you know where to play a note on the guitar when reading sheet music? If the note is C, which octave do you play?
#14
Quote by stratplyr01
So you think you know how to read music? I want to learn how. What ways did you learn how to read music? Strategies, instruments, any recommended methods? How long did it take you to get to your level of fluency?



get a method book
go through it 1 page at a time
It takes time, its like learning a new language
#16
I learned in 4th grade thanks to sax. There are plenty of pneumonical devices though.
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#18
Quote by demonofthenight
Would that work well with music that has alot of non-diatonic notes in it?
It's the only way to do it. Matheau pretty much nailed it.

Also, those of you saying sight reading are spot on. It doesn't even have to be hard music, just read through and play a lot of music. It just gets easier over time.

As for the EGBDF/FACE thing... I ****ing hate that. ****tiest method ever. Use landmarks instead (treble G, high G, bass F, low F). The notes in between come naturally.
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#19
^I sort of use intervals and degrees, but I keep stuffing up when accidentals are used. Thus my question.
Quote by Corwinoid
As for the EGBDF/FACE thing... I ****ing hate that. ****tiest method ever. Use landmarks instead (treble G, high G, bass F, low F). The notes in between come naturally.
Why would you say that, the majority of books I've read and teachers I've been taught by suggest the whole EGBDF thing.
#21
Quote by demonofthenight
^I sort of use intervals and degrees, but I keep stuffing up when accidentals are used. Thus my question.Why would you say that, the majority of books I've read and teachers I've been taught by suggest the whole EGBDF thing.

Because landmarks are faster, and teach you not to translate note->letter->pitch. You just see the pitches immediately... when you're learning to read, learning with the landmarks instead of every single pitch (knowing what they are is useful, but not trying to read that way), you'll learn what pitch is what by its interval from the chosen landmark. That really facilitates reading later on, when you're not even thinking absolutely about the notes, and just thinking about playing them relative to each other. It's also easier.
Quote by les_kris
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