#1
I want to major in something music related and was wondering if anyone has advice on finding out what schools have good music programs, etc? I've looked into Berklee of course, but at over $30k per year for tuition and fees alone, I'd like some other options to consider. Most other dedicated music colleges are very small (like, less than 1000) which isnt what I'm looking for. Im in GA and being semi-close would also be nice, not a deal breaker though. Any advice would be appreciated.
#2
lots of general education schools have music programs that are great. It doesnt have to be just a music school to get a good education in music.
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#3
Well yeah, Berklee is the only dedicated music school I would even consider right now. Looking for any music school, doesnt have to be a music only school.
#4
UGA should have a music program and it shouldn't be real expensive or competative for a state resident. Georgia Tech may have a program as well, though I believe they're private and, therefore, expensive.

I don't know the Georgia state0school system, but look into public universities/colleges. There's nothing wrong with a state school, and a lot of their honors programs offer you an education as good as anywhere in the country.

One bit of advice: Double major with something else. Go music/business so you can go into business if you can't make it as a musician, or music/biology and go to med school, or music/pre-law for the obvious career track. Get something else out of your education because music is unstable.
#5
UGA has a music program i believe, Mercer university in macon also seems to have a good one... but i'm also interested in this topic for i live in georgia as well
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#7
Quote by TheShred201
Juliard is another pretty big name music school from what I know...
Juilliard is regarded as the Harvard of music education. Naturally, it is expensive and disturbingly competative (I don't know the stats, but I would imagine so). It is also in NYC. While it might be cool for a Southern Boy (take no offense, I'm joking around) to live in NYC for 9 months every year, being reasonably close to home is a big deal to many college applicants (myself included).
#8
Would you have to go to a music only school to be able to teach music in like a college or high school?
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#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Juilliard is regarded as the Harvard of music education. Naturally, it is expensive and disturbingly competative (I don't know the stats, but I would imagine so). It is also in NYC. While it might be cool for a Southern Boy (take no offense, I'm joking around) to live in NYC for 9 months every year, being reasonably close to home is a big deal to many college applicants (myself included).
It's also pedigreed. You have to have a recommendation from a Julliard graduate to even apply.
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#11
I used to attend the University of the Arts in Philadelphia as a Jazz Studies (performance) major on guitar. If you're into jazz, and you want to get damn good at the guitar, it's a kickin place. And less expensive than Berklee. The downside is they really only do jazz, and they only allow you to be a performance major, which gets trying. You quickly become accustomed to practicing for 6-8 hours a day, and I'm not kidding in the slightest bit.

Now I (and a few other folks here) go to Hofstra University on Long Island. I'm a Music Education major with an instrumental concentration in Jazz Guitar. You can also major in composition, business, or jazz/commercial music. I think there is something else too...

I really dig Hofstra. It's a laid back program, and while there is a set of things the guitar teacher (Rick Stone www.rickstone.com ) wants you to know, you're mostly free to work on whatever you want on your own time.

Duquesne in Pittsburgh, PA has an EXCELLENT music production program I'm told, as does NYU.
#12
Quote by Guitar_Theory
I used to attend the University of the Arts in Philadelphia as a Jazz Studies (performance) major on guitar.
I live in Philly, so I heard a lot about UA. However, is it a pure art school or do they require studies in the liberal arts and sciences as well?

As stated many times, I suggest pursuing a double-major in music and business (or something else practical) so you have a fall-back plan, and that would not be available at a pure music school. Yes, it's good to be determined to be a musician, but don't be stupid about it.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
As stated many times, I suggest pursuing a double-major in music and business (or something else practical) so you have a fall-back plan, and that would not be available at a pure music school. Yes, it's good to be determined to be a musician, but don't be stupid about it.

This is advice that should be followed. What I did personally is enroll in a Music Merchandising major (I'm at Hofstra, as Guitar_Theory mentioned). It appears at many schools as Music Business or something of the sort. I'm planning on taking this degree (it gives you a very solid music background mixed in with some business classes for practical purposes) and heading to law school to work in the legal area of the music industry. When I talked with the chairman of the music department, he mentioned how many companies look for people who understand music and musicians but still know the business side of things and are qualified in this regard. In addition to the double-major option, this is something worth looking at.
#14
Practical or useful? With very very few exceptions, nobody gives a **** what your bachelors are in. Also, music majors are in high demand in difficult entry programs (med, law, etc). People who aren't clueless respect a music degree for what it is, the same as any other degree, and more so than some.

What your degree is in doesn't matter once you're out of school, unless you're doing something highly specialized -- some absurd amount of workers don't work in the field they thought they would ten years ago, most aren't even in a related field. I mean, dear god, I know somebody with a forestry degree who's a mid level manager at a fortune 1000 (maybe fortune 500, I'm not sure) company that builds medical devices. Not even closely related at all.

Seriously, nobody gives a damn what your degree is. Study what you WANT in school, and not what you think will be useful. Can't emphasize that enough. You have no idea where you're going to be in ten or fifteen years, and for most people it's silly to think that you do. Too much of your life is out of your control.

Ever hear somebody introduce a colleague as a "graduate of XUoW, with honors, and meritorious awards for giving the college president good head while dating his daughter"? No, and unless that's the only accomplishment you have to your name, you never will hear it. Once you're out, nobody gives a damn. Nobody gives a damn what your grades were, what your degree is in, what school you went to, or who's willing to fellate your ego.

One of the things that a dedicated music school will give you is education on how to actually live as a musician. And there are a lot of ways to do that... any good music program will have instructors willing to talk to you about working in music, not just the dedicated ones. The dedicated ones just give you more credibility as a musician.
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#15
i remember reading that julliard only takes like 5% of their applicants...
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#16
Also... the real reason people advise students to double major music and something else, is because most music majors drop out. If you don't have something else you're doing, you usually drop out completely. It is one of the three hardest academic programs, and has the second highest atrophy of any program. Organic chem, and EE are the only ones that even come close; and neither of them will work your ass like music will... they're just hard.
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#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I live in Philly, so I heard a lot about UA. However, is it a pure art school or do they require studies in the liberal arts and sciences as well?

As stated many times, I suggest pursuing a double-major in music and business (or something else practical) so you have a fall-back plan, and that would not be available at a pure music school. Yes, it's good to be determined to be a musician, but don't be stupid about it.


UArts is pretty much all music.

The small number of liberal arts classes you take are jokes.

But it's a bitch and a half to get into UArts to begin, so they expect you want to live music.
#18
Quote by bangoodcharlote
UGA should have a music program and it shouldn't be real expensive or competative for a state resident. Georgia Tech may have a program as well, though I believe they're private and, therefore, expensive.



Georgia Tech has a Master's program called "Music Technology" that deals with the technology side of music. Not just recording and stuff, but cool-as-mess stuff You'd have to get some sort of undergrad degree first, but I believe it can be in music. And Tech is a state school so it's not that expensive (relatively speaking).
#19
Quote by angus is god
Would you have to go to a music only school to be able to teach music in like a college or high school?


No. For a high school level as long as you get your degree is Music Education and pass the teacher liscenture tests you'll be fine. For College you'll need a masters in Music Education. For jazz musicians though if you get your masters in Jazz Studies you don't really need a Music Education degree to teach.
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#20
To adresss the initial question of this thread, If you go to a music school its far more competitive and the plus side is that at some of them you don't need to waste your time dealing with bull**** core classes. At any college with a music program though its a little less competitive which if you're not the best in Jazz and Classical music then it's ideal cuz they generally spend more 1 on 1 time with you especially if the departments small.
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#21
Quote by demigod90234
No. For a high school level as long as you get your degree is Music Education and pass the teacher liscenture tests you'll be fine. For College you'll need a masters in Music Education. For jazz musicians though if you get your masters in Jazz Studies you don't really need a Music Education degree to teach.


Teaching music in college requires either you to be an awesome performing musician (if you want to teach an instrument), have years and years and years and years of experience (to teach anything), or to have some sort of a degree.

At least several UArts teachers have no degree or just a Bachelors, their thing is they all basically have been the Philadelphia music scene for decades. Also a bunch of teachers only had an undergrad degree.

And generally to teach at a college, you don't need a masters in Music Ed, you just need a masters in something music related. Many of my teachers at Hofstra have Masters or PhD's in things like Composition or Conducting or Musicology. A Music Education degree is for if you want to teach in a school (public or private or college), and if you get a master's or PhD you probably want to teach other people to teach. Even though many public school systems require you now to get your master's after a certain amount of time.

Example: I want to teach at the university level. Currently I'm a Music Education major, I am considering going to graduate school to get a Master's in Music Theory, this would, at many universities that are not conservatories or rediculously high-brow, allow me to teach both private guitar lessons and teach undergrad level Music Theory classes. If you have a PhD in a subject you are considered a scholar/authority on it and can teach all levels of it.
#22
Quote by Guitar_Theory
Teaching music in college requires either you to be an awesome performing musician (if you want to teach an instrument), have years and years and years and years of experience (to teach anything),
This would count almost as an honorary degree. You haven't done the standard work to achieve your level of knowledge, but you've achieved that level of knowledge anyway.