#1
This is posted on my website (look at my signature), and I'm going to summarize it here. Tell me what you think, anything that I could improve, etc. I appreciate comments, and if you want to read the full version, check out my website.

The Technique:

Record your drum beat with [preferably] 2 drum overhead condensers and pan them left and right.
Use a good dynamic (the sm57 is perfect for the job) and record each of the drums that you used in the beat separately. This gives you a chance to experiment with different placement of the microphone without risking bleed. (try bringing the mic away, i think it really improves the sound)
Use a sequencer to sequence your beat with all the recorded samples.
Import one track to your multitracker for each of the instruments (eg. snare gets its own track, bass gets its own track, etc.)
Add whatever EQ and effects to each track that you want to make it sound right. Play the sequenced, isolated tracks along with the overhead tracks.

This is basically identical to using a professional drum mic kit, except there is no bleeding, and you only use one dynamic (as opposed to 7) and 2 condensers.

Anyways, tell me what you think, and check out my website.
#2
Record each drum on a separate take?

Might as well use samples if thats the thing you're going for.

Any time you do not record the entire kit at the same time, you are ruining the natural flow and interaction that in itself is the entire point to using and recording acoustic drums.

If all you want to do is stick good sounding drum noises that are flawless and have no bleed in your song, there are plenty of VSTi's for doing just such. Please use one.
#3
Thats not really what it is.

It is samples, and sequencing those samples, but you still get the natural flow and feel of the drums because you record an overhead track just playing the drumset with the 2 condensers.
You still get the room interaction and the natural flow, but you dont have to buy an expensive drum mic kit.

I explained it it more detail on my website, in my sig.
#4
Overheards or not, it seems like an overly drawn out process to achieve mediocre results.
#5
Quote by MrPillow
Record each drum on a separate take?

Might as well use samples if thats the thing you're going for.

Any time you do not record the entire kit at the same time, you are ruining the natural flow and interaction that in itself is the entire point to using and recording acoustic drums.

If all you want to do is stick good sounding drum noises that are flawless and have no bleed in your song, there are plenty of VSTi's for doing just such. Please use one.



I was going to post, but you did it for me.
There is poetry in despair.
#7
I don't think it would work well.... how would you capture the feel of complicated fills if you're recording each drum seperately? Seems like it would be a lot of bother and annoying for the drummer to get it all perfect.

EDIT: oh wait I misunderstood.... it's basically just making your own samples and using them but having a pre-recorded track as well. Still would be better just using something like EZDrummer probably.
Last edited by sam i am at May 24, 2008,
#10
Considering the effort (and money) that's been put into plugins like EZ Drummer, Addictive Drums, DFH and BFD the only reason for making your own sample set is to have something that is undeniably yours (regardless of quality). If I understood your process correctly you propose to record and use just one sample from each drum which would lead to very static and unrealistic drums.

For a quick example of how good drum sample plugins sound these days see my post here.