#1
well i write a lot of songs with power chords and then some simple riffs in between. and i use these but i don't know what they are called.. can anyone tell me what these are called? thx in advance..

example 1:

---------
---------
---------
----7----
----4----
----5----


example 2:

---------
---------
---------
----6----
----7----
----4----
#3
?
They're TRIads...tri, three, 3.

You could also just call them "chords"
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
nope, not TRIads if theres only two notes...
least i think not.
diad sounds good to me :P
#8
i thought triads have a 1st 3rd and 5th. Also the First one has a C sharp and an A so its a first and third of the A major scale. Correct me if im wrong.
#10



...ignore me, it's late
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Quote by MV4824
I thought triads were used in different ways... such as 1, 5, 8 or the way you put it.


well wouldnt a first fifth and an octave just be a powerchord? I could be wrong im new to theory.
#12
^ yes, technically a powerchord is a diad, chords require 3 or more notes. what is listed in the examples above are diads containing the root and third. the first example is root-third-root, the second example is an inversion containting third-root-third.
#15
5th is unnecessary so technically that could be considered a major chord, or probably more accurate, a major 3rd interval.
#16
To correct someone above me (dont know who as I'm too lazy to scroll up) these are called diads, not triads. You are hitting three different pitches at one, but since two of the notes are the same (an octave) it only has 2 different notes, hence diad. Naming these is simple, just use the intervals (learn them if you don't know them). So the first is an A as the root with a major third above it, or C#, and then another A.
Now you know how to do it, good luck.
#17
I don't think you really call them Diads. I've never heard that term used in a legit music theory sense (class, or textbook). The term I always hear used when you only have two different pitches in intervals. Just cause they're being played at the same time doesn't mean they get a special name, they're just...intervals with a doubled tone. Or you could consider them to be "implied chords" missing a tone.