#1
Hi all. I've been playing guitar now for almost 4 years. I feel as though I have progressed rather slow. I am reaching a point now where my lack of rhythm is very evident. I have never counted while playing before and I haven't played with many other guitarists. At this point I see how vital having a good right hand is and I am willing to do anything to improve my rhythm. Should I use a metronome? Are there exercises I can do? What should I be trying to learn/do while I count to a song? If anyone could point me in the right direction it would be appreciated. Great site and thanks a lot.
#2
Quote by GuyFrancon
Hi all. I've been playing guitar now for almost 4 years. I feel as though I have progressed rather slow. I am reaching a point now where my lack of rhythm is very evident. I have never counted while playing before and I haven't played with many other guitarists. At this point I see how vital having a good right hand is and I am willing to do anything to improve my rhythm. Should I use a metronome? Are there exercises I can do? What should I be trying to learn/do while I count to a song? If anyone could point me in the right direction it would be appreciated. Great site and thanks a lot.
Metronome is good.

Joining a band would also be beneficial. Probably a biger band, as the music wont be entirely dependent on you. Failing that, try playing along to music or to a cd.
#3
Get a snare drum book and play the rhythms on guitar. It helps loads. I use my dad's drum books all the time. There's a cool one on syncopation that just mindfucks with me every time.
#4
Always sync your playing to a metronome. Otherwise you'll develop bad rhythm


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Quote by entity0009
some retards decided it would be funny to use mental conditions as insults.
#5
Hmm, sounds good. When playing with a metronome, I want my down strums to be on the 1,2,3, and 4 right? Also what is a snare drum book? Sorry i realize these may be obvious questions to most, I just don't have very much musical experience.
#6
Well, 1-2-3-4 are downbeats, not necessarily strokes.

Snare Drum Books are books made for drumlines, like those at football stadiums and that.
Its just a straight rhythm book.
#8
Quote by GuyFrancon
Hi all. I've been playing guitar now for almost 4 years. I feel as though I have progressed rather slow. I am reaching a point now where my lack of rhythm is very evident. I have never counted while playing before and I haven't played with many other guitarists. At this point I see how vital having a good right hand is and I am willing to do anything to improve my rhythm. Should I use a metronome? Are there exercises I can do? What should I be trying to learn/do while I count to a song? If anyone could point me in the right direction it would be appreciated. Great site and thanks a lot.



for me the easiest way is to play along with your ipod. No zunes won't work because they suck
Take a look at my blog
#9
If you want to develop good time the use of a metronome is essential. I am not a metronome freak, and admittedly, I do not use one very often (I should use if more often).

Also, the idea of using a snare book is an excellent idea. You could also look for drum music on the internet to practice keeping rhythm.
#10
play along to some backing tracks of the song you want to learn...then join a band, best thing i ever did for rhythm
'I love her, but I love to fish...I'm gonna miss her"
#11
practice with a drum machine, especially one that has a swing feature, it's alot more fun and realistic compared to a metronome. I also found that learning to play bass helped my rhythm immensely, since you can't do a damn thing on bass without good rhythm.
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#12
^ +1

I've seen a lot of technically proficient bass players but not nearly enough bass player who simple have a great sense of timing. I'd rather listen to a bassist play simply and in time than play extremely complicated licks out of time.
#13
I tend to tap my feet like 1 2 3 4 sort of thing, but i guess maybe you need natural rhythmn to stop yourself speeding up or slowing down when doing that... So yeah, either try playing along to a song but LISTEN TO THE CD MORE THAN YOURSELF, your brain should tell your arms to strum naturally in time with CD. Also if you mainly listen to yourself while playing along to a CD, you dont know if youre in time or not until you finish before the song or vice versa lol. But yeah, Metronome or drum machine sounds good.
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#14
yeah, try to get a metronomey thing going on or something.

I have a friend like that.. and it's horrible.. he can make his own stuff up but when he tries to learn other solos he can get the notes but he can not get the rhythm of them for his life.. I try teaching him simple solos to songs like "No One Like You" by the Scorpions.. the first half of the intro took around 45 minutes for him to almost get..
took me about 45 seconds.
#15
i posted this at another thread but i'll post it again.
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geez, where to start.

i will list the artist name, followed by the albums that are recommended.


James Brown: "20 all-time greatest hits", "In The Jungle Groove", "live at the apollo" "james brown soul pride (the instrumentals, 1960-1969)"

The Meters: "Look Ka-Py Py", "Anthology"

Tower Of Power: "East Bay Grease" "Bump City" "Live and in living color"

Donny Hathaway: "Live"

Sly & the Family Stone: "greatest hits" "stand" "fresh"

Kool & the Gang: "spin their top hits"

Stevie Wonder: "Songs in the key of life" "talking book"

Herbie Hancock: "Head Hunters" "secrets" "man child" "thrust" "V.S.O.P. (side4)"

Otis Redding "The Very Best Of"

Ray Charles: "The Birth of Soul"

Al Green "let's stay together"

Tomo Fujita & Blue Funk "put on your funk face"


this is a combination of funk and r&b but both genre's are helpful.


here are some youtube videos, for you to get a taste of what you will be getting if you decide to use the list i provided.

James Brown:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DAfBZbz3tI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4IxfixArek

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeW_Zd2B2zU


The Meters:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FBnQvd_xzs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNzilDmPpCg


Tower Of Power:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGiJcvttbeM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3iKFj7cKHrs


Donny Hathaway:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0c2pp1kcyu4


Sly & the Family Stone:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ig-6f0g55c

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EscWg2n4vR4


Kool & The Gang:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6Th-87dTxg


Tomo Fujita:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNIVhz_dW1k


now a lot of this may seem cheesy to those who are not used to funk and r&b music. but i assure you, study this stuff, and your rhythm chops will be top notch. it can be applied to any other style of music you choose.

i really hope you, or someone else finds benefit in this post, because it took me like 20 minutes to put together.
http://richmusic.dmusic.com

"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#17
Wow, thanks so much to everyone who posted. I am starting to keep my foot moving while I play. I found about two years ago how much it helped to keep my right hand moving and I am starting to see a comparison by using my foot. Rich2K4, thank you for the effort. I will be listening and moving to those albums for some time. I appreciate the help, I have enough to work on now to keep me busy for awhile. You guys are the shi t.
#18
I would like to add try recording yourself playing along to songs, you will be able to hear the area where your playings off alot easier.