#1
Is there any reason why you never see maple fretboards on non-maple necks? Just to satisfy my own curiosity.
#3
because maple fretboards blow to work with to begin with, they aren't a very good fingerboard wood, youll notice that every time you see a guitar with one, its got a hard finish on it. maple is just too soft to be on its own. then you have clashing colors, "tone" factors...
#4
Maple needs to be finished, while some other neck woods don't need to be. It would make little sense to finish the fretboard and not the rest of the neck.
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#5
I was thinking, Some people prefer maple to rosewood etc., Even if there are in the minority, Surely some companies would cater for them, in a similar manner to left handed guitars, no?
#7
Quote by LP Addict
because maple fretboards blow to work with to begin with, they aren't a very good fingerboard wood, youll notice that every time you see a guitar with one, its got a hard finish on it. maple is just too soft to be on its own. then you have clashing colors, "tone" factors...
maple is plenty hard enough.
but it's more easily affected by moisture or lack of and it discolours easily, hence the finish.
lol @ tone factors.
Quote by jimRH7
I was thinking, Some people prefer maple to rosewood etc., Even if there are in the minority, Surely some companies would cater for them, in a similar manner to left handed guitars, no?
Maple is good for a neck, as well as a fretboard. So most often you see a maple board on a maple neck.

If you really want a maple board on neck of a different species
(not sure, but i think it's mahogany),
You might want to try out a Ric 650 Colorado.



and i don't suspect you'll find any problem with "tone factors"
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#8
Quote by LP Addict
yeah, ever heard of "custom" guitars? and cheap crappy fenders often provide guitars with maple fingerboards.


excuse me!
to me a fende ris not a fender without a maple board.which is why all my electrics have maple boards, and when i get my american strat, itll have a maple too.
crappy, i think not, im betting you play a les paul because of your name, and trust me,i would too, it they had maple boards.
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#9
Maple board ftw. After having playing my jimmie vaughan I don't like going back to rosewood.
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#10
honestly, i think its looks more than feel.

for example, my gibson looks ten times better with rosewood, but when i finally get an american strat (after build and new amp...) it will have a maple board for sure.
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#11
Also, it could be that maple-on-maple is easier to build, since technically, you just make a 'taller' neck and cut fret slots in it, w/o even having to make a seperate board and thus saving money and resources.


But, hey. I could just be full of shit.
#12
there's definitely something about a finished maple board that is appealing. I'm not sure what it is but I've always liked them. The look good and play great too. I have a strat with one and I love it. Don't really have a preference though - i dig maple, rosewood and ebony - those are the only one's I've tried. Never saw a guitar with a maple board on a different type of wood though.
#13
Shoot, now I really wanna see a maple fretboard with black binding and block inlays on a rosewood neck...
#14
i dont play a les paul thanks. BUT i have a les paul with a maple fingerboard, thanks again.

i like he feel of grain/wood, not polyurethane or lacquer. i dont pay hundreds for guitars/wood to build guitars for the feel of plastic or lacquer, wood should be respected.

Quote by Pikka Bird
Shoot, now I really wanna see a maple fretboard with black binding and block inlays on a rosewood neck...



This is close... mahogany neck... heres my LP

Last edited by LP Addict at May 23, 2008,
#15
^Yeah, I've seen that. In fact, I think yours is the one that planted the appreciation of that combo in my brain (as far as I recall you posted that one quite a while back... A Taro, right?). I just want to see it on a rosewood neck because I love the grain (meaning I'd be wanting nice rosewood, like jscustom's neck wood), or failing that, a mahogany neck that's only clearcoated (IE. no opague finish).
#16
Quote by LP Addict
i dont play a les paul thanks. BUT i have a les paul with a maple fingerboard, thanks again.

i like he feel of grain/wood, not polyurethane or lacquer. i dont pay hundreds for guitars/wood to build guitars for the feel of plastic or lacquer, wood should be respected.


This is close... mahogany neck... heres my LP



You owned him Lp addict... haha
#17
I like the old 70's LP Customs with the maple neck and pearl block inlays...those are awesome, especially in black.
I think you don't see maple boards on darker necks because it just wouldn't look very good- the headstock especially. Dark on light or matching is the way to go.
#18
Thinking about this for a moment, what is the cause of your name, LP Addict? And also, if you pay to feel the wood, then what's your take on, say, a finished body (which I feel a great bit more than the fingerboard)? Or even a finished neck, arguably the thing that gets felt up the most?
Last edited by Pikka Bird at May 24, 2008,
#19
all of the guitars i build have tung-oiled necks, danish oil bodies, except for one, which has a poly-finsh body. i used to have quite a collection of les pauls when i made this account, but ive kind of grown out of them.
#20
Quote by Invader Jim
Also, it could be that maple-on-maple is easier to build, since technically, you just make a 'taller' neck and cut fret slots in it, w/o even having to make a seperate board and thus saving money and resources.


But, hey. I could just be full of shit.


That's how i thought they did it as well, When you see fenders etc. they have that little line of darker wood down the back, To put the truss rod in. But i was having a look at guitars in a shop last week, (the ones with maple boards, but no line down the back) And it looked like they were built with a separate maple fretboard. I assume that's how they make the warmoth necks as well, since (from memory!) you can get different types of maple for fretbaords and necks...

I haven't played alot of maple necked guitars, But the one that's stuck in my memory was an entry level washburn. I played the maple fretboard one and the rosewood one, and the maple was mush better - It's kind of smoother, the rosewood one felt alot harsher to play.
#21
I have a feeling that the real reason is because it'd look rather ugly and clashing.
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#22
Quote by MrCarrot
I have a feeling that the real reason is because it'd look rather ugly and clashing.


Hmm, Personally, I don't belive the argument from asthetics - If you go into a Guitar shop, the chances are your going to find at least one guitar that YOU think is ugly, or clashing, But guitar companies still make them, and people still buy them. Plus many maple necked guitars have painted headstocks anyway, It wouldn't look that different, (at least from front -on) would it?

Quote by here_is_no_why
Maple needs to be finished, while some other neck woods don't need to be. It would make little sense to finish the fretboard and not the rest of the neck.


I was thinking about this as well. I was thinking, I read somewhere the reason they don't finish rosewood is because the wood itself is very oily, so they can't get the finish to take to it. Surely, on say mahogany necks which are normally finished anyway, it would be easier for them to finish the whole thing in one go, rather than leave out the fretboard (in the case of rosewood)?


Is rosewood cheaper than maple?

Can you finish rosewood so it feels like maple?
#23
Rosewood is MUCH more expensive than maple. It doesn't need to be oiled or finished because it is naturally rather stable and has some oil in it. You could finish it, but keep in mind that what you're feeling with maple, unless it has a worn or no finish, is the finish and not the actual maple. So yes, it would feel like any other finished neck. Many people prefer the raw feel though, so if you can get away with not finishing a neck, especially one as beautiful and smooth as rosewood, most people would.
With regards to finishing the neck but not the fretboard: I have noticed that places like Warmoth charge less for a finished neck with a raw board. I can only assume that they finish the neck before they put the fingerboard on, which would be cheaper than doing the whole thing.
#24
Quote by jimRH7
That's how i thought they did it as well, When you see fenders etc. they have that little line of darker wood down the back, To put the truss rod in. But i was having a look at guitars in a shop last week, (the ones with maple boards, but no line down the back) And it looked like they were built with a separate maple fretboard. I assume that's how they make the warmoth necks as well, since (from memory!) you can get different types of maple for fretbaords and necks...

I haven't played alot of maple necked guitars, But the one that's stuck in my memory was an entry level washburn. I played the maple fretboard one and the rosewood one, and the maple was mush better - It's kind of smoother, the rosewood one felt alot harsher to play.

Crap quality rosewood really sucks, though. It's all pale and dead-looking, and feels like 800 grit sand paper... My Squier Affinity (I've said it before and will say it again: It's made much better than any other Affinity I've ever seen or played, so STFU ) has a beautiful rosewood fretboard, but it also has the skunk stripe . I love the look of the fretboard; it's really dark, almost looks like ebony in dim light (and I've never even stained it like I did a couple of my other entry-level guitars ).

Pics! Pardon the fretboard wear; the guitar's been through alot...







Last edited by Invader Jim at May 25, 2008,