#1
Hey everybody, I have a quick question.
I was jamming with a friend last night, and I had a chord progression that I said was in C, and he said it was in F. I was wondering, what key is it actually in? The chords were: Dm7, Cmaj7, Bm7b5, and Em7. Any help appreciated.
#2
im not the best one to answer that question but how is it in F. there is no F in the progression
#3
Quote by toolfan88
im not the best one to answer that question but how is it in F. there is no F in the progression


That was kinda what I thought too.
#4
if i'm right, it should be in C, because in music theory, the 7th chord of a scale is diminished, which means it has a flatted 5- the Bw/ the b5 is the 7, making C the tonic
Quote by ratracekid111
And the Tax! Dear God! When I only get one virgin a month, I want the whole freakin' thing! The damn government shouldn't be chopping it in half
#5
Quote by toolfan88
im not the best one to answer that question but how is it in F. there is no F in the progression


uhh, the tonic of the scale does not have to be in the progression to make it a certain key, if you play a progression of Em, Am, C, D, you are still in the key of G, even though you havent played the tonic
#6
Quote by mdawg24
Hey everybody, I have a quick question.
I was jamming with a friend last night, and I had a chord progression that I said was in C, and he said it was in F. I was wondering, what key is it actually in? The chords were: Dm7, Cmaj7, Bm7b5, and Em7. Any help appreciated.



Those chords are all in C Major. Its not a very strong C Major progression, but if you were going to solo over it, the C major scale would sound fine.

You can tell your friend that its definitely not in F major.
shred is gaudy music
#7
and i think its C, because Em7 is not a chord in the F major scale
#10
Quote by GoDrex
I would think of that as E minor...
Which would be the same as G major.
#11
Quote by GoDrex
I would think of that as E minor...


I think the TS's progression was this: Dm7, Cmaj7, Bm7b5, and Em7

Im not sure where that other progression was coming from.


Quote by Vykk Draygo
Which would be the same as G major.


related key.... not same key.

anyway it doesn't really matter because that wasn't even the TS's progression.
shred is gaudy music
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
related key.... not same key.

anyway it doesn't really matter because that wasn't even the TS's progression.

Yeah, I realize that the root is different, but it's the same position, which was my only point. Not a very good point though, that.
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
I think the TS's progression was this: Dm7, Cmaj7, Bm7b5, and Em7

Im not sure where that other progression was coming from.


related key.... not same key.

anyway it doesn't really matter because that wasn't even the TS's progression.


yeah I wasn't talking at all about the TS's progression...
#14
With some fooling around, you could get that to resolve to Dm.

Edit: On recond thought, not really. It's C.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at May 24, 2008,
#16
Quote by mdawg24
Hey everybody, I have a quick question.
I was jamming with a friend last night, and I had a chord progression that I said was in C, and he said it was in F. I was wondering, what key is it actually in? The chords were: Dm7, Cmaj7, Bm7b5, and Em7. Any help appreciated.



your progression Cmaj

ii - I - vii0 - iii pretty much as i see it
song stuck in my head today


#17
Quote by mdawg24
Hey everybody, I have a quick question.
I was jamming with a friend last night, and I had a chord progression that I said was in C, and he said it was in F. I was wondering, what key is it actually in? The chords were: Dm7, Cmaj7, Bm7b5, and Em7. Any help appreciated.
It's definantly a strictly C progression.

What instrument was your friend playing? Was your friend playing a harmonica? I'd play an F harmonica over a C progression.
#18
Quote by demonofthenight
It's definantly a strictly C progression.

What instrument was your friend playing? Was your friend playing a harmonica? I'd play an F harmonica over a C progression.
I've personally never understood the whole cross harp thing. I can't see why an F harmonica would be better to play over C major than, well, a C major harmonica. I guess maybe the minor 7th would be useful if it was a C blues, but as for straight C major, you'd have to bend for the B natural and that's not even always possible. Care to explain?
#19
Quote by grampastumpy
I can't see why an F harmonica would be better to play over C major than, well, a C major harmonica.
F major: F G A Bb C D E
C Mixolydian: C D E F G A Bb

You need an F harmonica to play the C Mixo scale used to much in the blues (sorta).


I'm pretty sure every harmonica can play all 12 tones, but the Bb must be easier on the F harmonica than the C.


I don't know the answer, but I'd be surprised if I were completely wrong on this; it makes a lot of sense.
#20
Quote by grampastumpy
I've personally never understood the whole cross harp thing. I can't see why an F harmonica would be better to play over C major than, well, a C major harmonica. I guess maybe the minor 7th would be useful if it was a C blues, but as for straight C major, you'd have to bend for the B natural and that's not even always possible. Care to explain?
Sorry if you know any of this, I'm going back to basics.
When breathing in (as you can change the note by either breathing in or out) you can do a "bend" which is basically where the note lowers. It's an unnatural note that needs a musical ear to keep it in the right pitch. So although naturally a harp can only play 7 in theory (sadly only 6 in each position ), with bends you can play so many more notes. Then theres also overblows, but only pro's can do that.
Also, some diatonic notes on a harp are hard to hit, like the sixth, the seventh (in some positions). But when you play the same harp in a different key, it could be easier. My minds too fuccked at the moment to give you examples, and I'm only a begginer on harp.
#21
Quote by bangoodcharlote
F major: F G A Bb C D E
C Mixolydian: C D E F G A Bb

You need an F harmonica to play the C Mixo scale used to much in the blues (sorta).


I'm pretty sure every harmonica can play all 12 tones, but the Bb must be easier on the F harmonica than the C.


I don't know the answer, but I'd be surprised if I were completely wrong on this; it makes a lot of sense.
Yeah, I acknowledged that it would be perfect for blues, but for plain old diatonic stuff I'd MUCH rather use a C harp for something in C. And every harmonica CAN play all 12 tones, just not in every octave and that is a huge pain in the ass sometimes.
Quote by demonofthenight
Sorry if you know any of this, I'm going back to basics.
When breathing in (as you can change the note by either breathing in or out) you can do a "bend" which is basically where the note lowers. It's an unnatural note that needs a musical ear to keep it in the right pitch. So although naturally a harp can only play 7 in theory (sadly only 6 in each position ), with bends you can play so many more notes. Then theres also overblows, but only pro's can do that.
Also, some diatonic notes on a harp are hard to hit, like the sixth, the seventh (in some positions). But when you play the same harp in a different key, it could be easier. My minds too fuccked at the moment to give you examples, and I'm only a begginer on harp.
I get bends and stuff, and while I haven't mastered them I don't...COMPLETELY suck at them(except the 3rd hole draw, that thing sounds like a damn kazoo). Overblows actually aren't that hard, to me they're easier than draw bends. But anyways, yeah in a C blues I can see the value of an F harp, but IMO it can't really be much easier to bend a C down to B and a Bb down to an A than to just hit them normally on a C harp in strictly diatonic music.

EDIT: I hath commited the mortal sin of double posting. Woops.
Last edited by grampastumpy at May 24, 2008,
#22
^Which harp brand do you use? On my lee oskar, overblows are only achieved by modifying the hell out of it. Perhaps you mean blow bends?
Quote by bangoodcharlote
F major: F G A Bb C D E
C Mixolydian: C D E F G A Bb

You need an F harmonica to play the C Mixo scale used to much in the blues (sorta).


I'm pretty sure every harmonica can play all 12 tones, but the Bb must be easier on the F harmonica than the C.


I don't know the answer, but I'd be surprised if I were completely wrong on this; it makes a lot of sense.
Each individual diatonic harp is only capable of 7 notes naturally (6 in each octave, in one octave its only 5 notes). Bb is easier on an F, but F# is also easy on an F harp as a bend (IMO the easiest bend on an F harp). But the six hole imo is the easiest bend on a C harp. You can sort of play C mixo on a C harp, but only if you bend the B.

After you learn overblows (which allows for a completely chromatic scale to be playable on a harp) all that matters is that your harp is comfortable for you.
#23
Quote by demonofthenight
^Which harp brand do you use? On my lee oskar, overblows are only achieved by modifying the hell out of it. Perhaps you mean blow bends?Each individual diatonic harp is only capable of 7 notes naturally (6 in each octave, in one octave its only 5 notes). Bb is easier on an F, but F# is also easy on an F harp as a bend (IMO the easiest bend on an F harp). But the six hole imo is the easiest bend on a C harp. You can sort of play C mixo on a C harp, but only if you bend the B.

After you learn overblows (which allows for a completely chromatic scale to be playable on a harp) all that matters is that your harp is comfortable for you.
Oh woops, yeah I think I meant blow bends. I also use a Lee Oskar. Anyway...HOLY JESUS COMPLETELY CHROMATIC SCALE!?!?!? WANTWANTWANT. Care to offer any basic info on overblows?
#24
Quote by grampastumpy
Oh woops, yeah I think I meant blow bends. I also use a Lee Oskar. Anyway...HOLY JESUS COMPLETELY CHROMATIC SCALE!?!?!? WANTWANTWANT. Care to offer any basic info on overblows?
Oh lawd, this is turning into a harmonica thread. If psych raeps me for spamming, it'll be your fault.

On holes 2-6, if you use the same technique as draw bending for blow bending you can blow the hole in such a way that that the draw reed will play instead of the blow reed. It's actually more complicated than just that, but truth is I dont completely know how to do it. I do know that this cant be done on a lee oskar without heavy modding, which I do know how to do. This note will be a semitone above the draw reed, for some strange reason which I dont know.

In short, overblowing is ridiculously hard and normally takes people years to learn to do. I've only be playing for a couple of months.

read the articles from this: http://www.overblow.com/