#1
Wasn't sure how to title this, but I was wondering, when it comes to switching strings, such as doing a scale, would it be proper technique to take all fingers off the previous string before hitting the next string? Also, does anyone know how I can prevent my strings from ringing open after I take my fingers off? It get's a little annoying to hear all my string open. >.<
#3
Quote by Shiruyumi
Wasn't sure how to title this, but I was wondering, when it comes to switching strings, such as doing a scale, would it be proper technique to take all fingers off the previous string before hitting the next string? Also, does anyone know how I can prevent my strings from ringing open after I take my fingers off? It get's a little annoying to hear all my string open. >.<

That's kinda weird, you know scales but you don't know how to stop the ringing noise...I learned it as "damping," I don't know what you guys wanna call it, but it's just like palm muting...but actually MUTING the string and not playing it.

I'm still a beginner but, can you tell me where you learned some of the common scales? Other than your guitar teacher if you have one.
#4
Type in guitar scale on your computer, or go look of justin sandercoe on you tube

You can gt your scales either way

personally, I learned major and pentatonic by ear, finding the different formations on my own

It helps with creative playing and improv
#5
I play a lot of metal, and I notice once I start playing a lot of notes they blend together.

I don't understand what you mean by damping btw >.<
#6
Quote by Fromaster
Type in guitar scale on your computer, or go look of justin sandercoe on you tube

You can gt your scales either way

personally, I learned major and pentatonic by ear, finding the different formations on my own

It helps with creative playing and improv

Cool, so you're saying you learned the formation and used it for those scales? Sounds easier.
#7
kinda

You gotta know some theory

And you have to know what a major and a pentatonic sounds like

For instance: You can play the major G scale on only the 2, 3, 4, and 5 frets

But you can go up about two and a half octaves, going up the neck to the high frets
When you combine them you get a fluid scale,and put different fragments together melodically and speed it up to something that will sound like happy Yngwie

Any Questions?
#8
Quote by Shiruyumi
I play a lot of metal, and I notice once I start playing a lot of notes they blend together.

I don't understand what you mean by damping btw >.<

Well after you play a chord or note, just cover the strings with the edge of your hand/palm. Your wrist should be at a position where you can pick strings and be able to cover them with your hand too. So basically you're just covering the strings so there's no noise anymore.

And also, do you mean blending together in a bad way? Because that happens to me too, and I don't know what to do about it.
#9
Quote by Fromaster
kinda

You gotta know some theory

And you have to know what a major and a pentatonic sounds like

For instance: You can play the major G scale on only the 2, 3, 4, and 5 frets

But you can go up about two and a half octaves, going up the neck to the high frets
When you combine them you get a fluid scale,and put different fragments together melodically and speed it up to something that will sound like happy Yngwie

Any Questions?

Ya one question, are there any ways I can learn theory without going to a teacher or reading the dreadfully boring one on UG?
#10
Two ways to dampen a string

1: Rest your right hand on the ends of the strings,where they connect to the Bridge

2: Touch one of your left fingers to the vibrating string

What ever works better when you are playing
Use different things for different situations
#11
The palm muting idea works great for slower stuff when you have time to do it, doesn't seem to work out so well when doing a lick. >.<
#12
Ha

Theory is simple

Theres a lot of different types of theory

Chord Progressions
Scales
Rhythm

You can find it at......... uh....blackbeltguitar.com

Don't read all of it

A lot is helpful though

But a lot of it will be over your head
learn your basic chord progressions
And your major and pentatonic scales

Minor can wait

There are three different types
of minor scales, they intertwine with each other

Therefore, minor is a BITCH

But, most importantly, no matter how much theory you learn, play with your soul
#13
It will take practice

Don't expect to pick it up and shred like EVH or Yngwie

The sad truth is they have the same thing happen, but percussion drowns it out

Cleanliness comes with practice, just give it time, speed does too.
#14
To Fromaster: I try to use number 1 so it doesn't actually palm mute it, and it works pretty well.
#15
Like I said, whatever works for you

Remember: Each finger is 25% of your playing

Your pinky should match your middle and ring in accuracy, strength, and agility
Use EVERY finger for EVERY job
#16
Try lifting your fingers straight off of the string

Don't yank them down off of them

That was my problem

Lift it STRAIGHT up, move to the other string

Just find your own way, and it will get better with time
#17
Fromaster, how can someone effectively switch between power chords on diff strings? I've tried it but my fingers seem to slip off and mess the change up.

Thanks
#18
Go slowly

The first song I learned was iron man, and before i knew it the E string was ringing and feedback started to buzz in

Go SLOW

Like, stupid slow

That way, your fingers get used to doing it the right way

Then you speed up

SLOWLY
#19
Could it be related to my guitar having low actions? ( I've got the strings really close to the fret board.)
#22
I've also noticed that no matter how straight I pull off my finger they still ring out as if I did a pull off.
#23
I'm gonna go try Iron Man and do what you said.

But I don't think you understood what I said, perhaps I worded it wrong. I meant say if you were doing a power chord using the low E and A strings then wanted to switch to using the A and D or the D and G strings.
#24
I think that's what he was refering to was when switching off a chord with the E and A string the E string would keep ringing out.