#1
modes are confusing me more and more and these are three questions i want to ask.

1) if i play C Ionian over an Aeolian progression will it sound like a minor?

2) how do i do those chords in metal where the chords don't sound right due to distortion?

3) if i play in a mode of C Ionian is it in the key of C Major or A Minor for example?


thanks for taking the time to read and answer my questions if you do

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#2
1. You don't. C Ionian is played over C Ionian progressions. A Aeolian is played over A Aeolian progressions.

2. Play power chords and imply the other tones.

3. C

You appear not to grasp basic concepts of theory and therefore, are not ready for modes. Please read the link in my sig to get started.
#3
ok, i just realised my questions are unclear i meant:

1) if i play C major over an A Aeolian progression will it sound like a minor?
and
3) if i play in D dorian is it in the key of C Major or A Minor for example?

EDIT: i think i get number three now anyway - its in Cmajor because the parent scale is C major right?

thanks bangoodcharlotte

PS i've read the theory FAQ and link in your sig

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
Last edited by metallicafan616 at May 24, 2008,
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
1. Aeolian from what note, C or A?

2. C Aeolian is a type of C minor scale, so neither.



bahh........i neeed to check my posts.....ill edit it in a sec.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#6
C major progression= C major scale
A minor Progression= A minor scale.
They're the same notes, but they sound different because of the roots.
#7
Quote by metallicafan616
ok, i just realised my questions are unclear i meant:

1) if i play C major over an A Aeolian progression will it sound like a minor?
and
3) if i play in D dorian is it in the key of C Major or A Minor for example?

EDIT: i think i get number three now anyway - its in Cmajor because the parent scale is C major right?

thanks bangoodcharlotte

PS i've read the theory FAQ and link in your sig


1) if you play the C major pattern over an A minor progression...... it will sound as A minor. (there is no reason to refer to their modal names other than they are bigger words and sound impressive)

*as a general rule, whatever you play melodicly will always be heard as it relates to the chord / tonal center your playing over.

3) If you play in D dorian, your key signature will be the same as C major, however your tonal center will be D.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
3) If you play in D dorian, your key signature will be the same as C major, however your tonal center will be D.
To aid the performer, a note is sometimes written with a * staying "key signature denotes D Dorian."
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
To aid the performer, a note is sometimes written with a * staying "key signature denotes D Dorian."


but usually not
shred is gaudy music
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
True, but I think it should be included. Why leave anything in question?


Well, if you understand modes, its not necessary. If you don't, it won't matter anyway.

There are enough clues in the music itself.
shred is gaudy music
#12
Probably the best thing to do is not think of modes as major scales starting on different notes as many people teach them. For example some people choose to teach/think the way that C Lydian is a G major Scale Starting on C. What you should do is think of them as Major scales with altered degrees. For example if I were to play C Lydian I play a major scale with a #11 (or # 4). It makes it a bit easier then when you can think of accidental notes so you can vary up scales for soloing/lead lines when writing songs.

In other words if you have a Chord progression that goes Dm-FM-CM-BbM-CM then you know 1) that its in the D natural minor scale or a scale with one flat. 2)Modally speaking you can play your solo or leads using the following scales: D aeolian, F Ionian, C Mixolydian, D minor pent, C Major pent, D Blues, F major pent.

Formula wise heres the best way to view modes (all based off the major scale, so know your major scales)

Ionian=major
Dorian= b3, b7
Phrygian= b9, b3, b13, b7
Lydian- #4
Mixolydian- b7
Aeolian- b3, b6, b7
Locrian - b9, b3, b5, b6, b7

***
Wanna try something trippy? use this progression with the C Lydian-Mixolydian Scale (C major scale with a #4 & a b7)

Dm-CM- Bb+-CM played a little up beat with a spanish/latin feel.
Gear:Schecter C1+
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Credentials: BFA in Theater Performance, BM in Music Composition
#13
Quote by metallicafan616
ok, i just realised my questions are unclear i meant:

1) if i play C major over an A Aeolian progression will it sound like a minor?
and
3) if i play in D dorian is it in the key of C Major or A Minor for example?

EDIT: i think i get number three now anyway - its in Cmajor because the parent scale is C major right?

thanks bangoodcharlotte

PS i've read the theory FAQ and link in your sig


1. the 6th degree of A, not the second. the 2nd will make it sound dorian

3. c minor. the dorian mode is formed from the minor scale.
#14
Quote by demigod90234
2)Modally speaking you can play your solo or leads using the following scales: D aeolian, F Ionian, C Mixolydian, D minor pent, C Major pent, D Blues, F major pent.
This is overally complex. The progression is a Dm progression, nothing more.