#1
Hey,

I have been playing guitar here and there for a few years. Not until recently have I really gotten into it. I was checking out Gibson's website and saw a lessons section. I saw this dude showing how to play a 16 note A minor pentatonic scale. It sounded cool. I'm not one to be able to pick a note out, so when I was listening i have no idea what he was playing and I couldn't really follow his hand.

I have some basic scale books but I can't find anything with this in it. Does anyone know where I can find this scale? I have looked for it in books and on the internet.

Thanks,
Justin
#3
Quote by hollow1928years
A 16 note pentatonic scale doesn't make sense because a pentatonic scale has 5 notes.


I guess he meant a pentatonic scale, but that guy was playing 3 pentaves, with one extra note. (octave = 8 notes , pentave = 5 notes, I've made that up myself right now )
(srry for my bad english)

And by playing 3 pentaves, I mean he played the same scale over and over, 3 times, but eacht time 1 octave higher
So that makes 16 notes.

BTW is pentave an existing word??:P
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#4
It probably just goes through 3 octaves and ends on the root again.
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#6
Quote by turksegitarist
Yeah thats what i actually meant:P


So he just played the normal minor pentatonic scale.
You need to learn the notes all over the fretboard.
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#7
I think that guy who "created" a "16 note pentatonic scale" should have his degree(s) torn to pieces.
#8
The sixteen-note scale could mean that instead of dividing an octave into 12 equal parts, it's divided into 16 different parts, making all the notes different. A pentatonic scale is made up of five notes, but these five notes are taken from the system that's divided into 12. A pentatonic scale could therefore logically be made from a 16-note overall scale(don't think scale is the right word for this.) I've heard this being done in 21-note scales, following the Fibonacci Sequence, but not in 16-note ones. There's some very interesting, world-shaking articles written on the subject on the internet.
#9
Quote by Declan87
I've heard this being done in 21-note scales, following the Fibonacci Sequence, but not in 16-note ones. There's some very interesting, world-shaking articles written on the subject on the internet.


Link?