#1
First post and glad to have found this forum.

My son has been showing a lot of interest in learning to play guitar and really wants to play electric. Many people have said the it would be easier for him to start with a nylon string acoustic.

Will just about any full acoustic do? We've visited Sam Ash and have seen some for about $100. From what I understand, he'll need a tuner, bag, case and stand.

Could you guys point me in the right direction?

Thanks for you help...

Joe
#2
i wouldn't go for the nylon stringed guitar. they are meant for classical music. the necks are usually a little wider and the strings will twist under the kid's fingers if they aren't used to playing guitar. just go for a regular acoustic guitar. i wouldn't recommend a high end one unless you want him to pass it down in the family but i don't really recommend bottom of the barrel either
#3
just get a electric easier to learn on
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#4
look at some epiphones, or hohners and yeah, go with a plain acoustic not a classical.
#5
I agree, don't go the nylon string route, and if the kid is only ten, it's not going to matter what quality guitar you get, but, maybe spending an extra few bucks would mean the guitar will last a little longer, you can get a pretty decent acoustic between 100-150, or, if you want to pick everything up in one shot, you should look at the starter kits, they will supply you with tuner, extra strings, strap gig bag.
#6
If your sons even close enough in size , make sure you get him a full sized guitar. The smaller ones arent as good and they also are hard to transition from
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#7
If he does want to play an electric in future, I`d buy him an steel-string acoustic.
I did so, because I didnt know if the guitar isn`t just a temporary feeling

Now I know it`s my passion, so I bought myself an electric, tube amp... and other stuff.

Don`t buy him super-expensive gear for a start, make sure he won`t get bored with guitar
after a week. Espescially if he`s just a kid.
#9
In my opinion, steel strings are harder to learn on than electrics. I would go with an electric starter pack because the strings are not as thick, the body isn't as thick, and those are the things that would make learning guitar easier.
#10
Quote by GeekInThePink
Epiphone starter packs are gonna be your best bet.

+1, and a Micro Cube. But to be honest, a a Squire will be pretty similar quality. Expecially for a ten year old.

I can tell you this, as I remember learning guitar aged 8 or 9, I didn't give a flying **** (if you'll excuse the language) about what it was really, as I had no knowledge of what anything was.

Getting an acoustic guitar is better though, in the long run. It will improve finger strength and probably be cheaper. The best thing to pay for however is lessons. I can't explain how much of a help they are.

Quote by kop4
If he does want to play an electric in future, I`d buy him an steel-string acoustic.
I did so, because I didnt know if the guitar isn`t just a temporary feeling

Now I know it`s my passion, so I bought myself an electric, tube amp... and other stuff.

Don`t buy him super-expensive gear for a start, make sure he won`t get bored with guitar
after a week. Espescially if he`s just a kid.

This guy's got it right, guitar can be quite tedious when beginning, like any instrument. It's more important that he's enjoying it though I guess. I learnt classical guitar at the same time as learning electric and to be honest playing electric destroyed all the good technique I had from classical!
Last edited by ze monsta at May 25, 2008,
#11
Thanks guys for your quick replies.

I didn't want to get him a Walmart chepo type. We have been visiting a Sam Ash store that very close to the house and he's been messing around with the different guitars.

What are you thought for buying equipment from Sam Ash? I've read posts on other forums of many people that do not like them. I don't know what that's all about.

On our last visit to Sam Ash, which was on Thursday, we overheard a salesman indicate that there will be a Memorial Day Sale store wide. I'm not sure how true this is but on their site, I haven't seen anything yet.

I keep my eyes out for a starter package and again, you thought on Sam Ash....

Thanks,

Joe
#12
I found these on Sam Ash's and Guitar Center's websites. I'm not sure if these are just about the same or is one better than the other. They are packages that include bag, electronic tuner, strap, picks and dvd.

Epiphone DR-90
Yamaha F325
Ibanez IJV100S

Thanks,

Joe
#13
Get your son a Yamaha FG700s if you want to spend as little as possible and still get a great guitar.
#14
Yamaha, they're really well built for the price, and are rather easy to play compared to other acoustics I played (action-wise).
#15
wal mart guitars aren't that bad to start out on, especially if you're worried that he might not keep playing. the sound on the acoustics aren't that bad. they're not great by any means, but not that bad

by the way, people don't like guitar center and sam ash because of the whole "corporate music store" bull. they might have had one or two bad experiences with the store that is closest to them and have just hated it ever since. i've been going to them for 10 years and never had a problem
#16
DON'T get the epiphone (electric) starter set. I had one, and from my experience the guitar was shoddy and got poor tone, and made it a tiresome chore to get decent sounds from it. Not to mention when I took it out, everything was loose (neck, bridge, pickups, etc) and needed tightened down, which didn't help the intonation much. Not to mention the amp was utter crap.

You can get much more bang for your buck buying from a new & used place like Music-Go-Round (if you have those). A reasonable solid state practice amp will run you between $40 - $80 depending on what kind of deal you can find, and a decent starter electric will run around $80 - $120 (I actually got a nice Jackson Dinky for around $110). It's a little more expensive then the starter packs, but you'll get your money's worth.

Don't sweat straps and tuners. They run between $5 - $15.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#17
Quote by acoustic-fan
I found these on Sam Ash's and Guitar Center's websites. I'm not sure if these are just about the same or is one better than the other. They are packages that include bag, electronic tuner, strap, picks and dvd.

Epiphone DR-90
Yamaha F325
Ibanez IJV100S

Thanks,

Joe


I would recommend the Epiphone DR-90S (Note the "S" as the top is solid as compared to the DR-90) but you may need to buy a tuner considering the package only comes with a pitch pipe.

If you can't grab the DR-90S, I would recommend the Yamaha Gig-Maker (or the Gig Maker Deluxe if you can muster it) pack (the F325). It was the guitar I first started on and was pretty well set up straight from the factory.

Another notable mention would be the Fender DG8S:
http://www.fender.com/products//search.php?partno=0950801100
A lot of people dislike Fender acoustics but preference is all subjective.
#18
Thanks again...good info...

Just wanted to confirm the general thought is, if you want to play electric...start with an acoutic. Does this rule always apply?

Can someone who has never played start with an electric? Will the learning curve be steeper?

Just wanted you get confirmation on this....

Thanks..
#19
get a decent sounding guitar and make sure it is set up with low action so it's easier to play. For your son I would recommend having extra light strings put on because their easier to push down.

If you buy him a guitar and he plays it much you will need to change strings once a month. Strings need to be changed fairly frequently as they go dead.

I recommend Martin Marquis (or SP) Phosphor Bronze Extra lights. By 6 or 8 sets at a time on line and you'll get them at a substantial savings. Stay away from the coated strings as they only coat the wound strings and not the unwound strings so the wound strings last longer but the unwound ones still go bad just like the others so you're not saving any money.

When he gets bigger he can graduate to light or medium strings.

Buy a decent guitar or he won't play it. If it doesn't sound good it won't get played.

Look into a Blueridge BR-140 guitar. It's solid wood (not plywood) (thats a good thing) and you should be able to pick up a used one for $300.
#20
We made the visit to sam ash since it's so close to the house. We looked a different guitars and found an Epiphone AJ100 for $120. What are you thoughts of this guitar? Is it decent? My budget is $200, which has to include bag and tuner.

Since it might cost me around $200 no matter how I piece it together, might as well go with the Yamaha Gigmaker Deluxe.

Let me know what you think...
Last edited by acoustic-fan at May 26, 2008,
#21
STOPPPP
if he wants to play electric, let him. I learned on an electric, and it would be alot easier (thinner neck, strings, smaller, ect). Plus he can mess with distortion to keep him interested. TRUST ME, he will like it better if thats what he wants to play.
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#22
Maybe I was misled...

It just happen that everyone I would ask...well just about everyone, continue to tell me the acoustic was best way for him to learn.

So just to get this correct, it is possible to learn on an electric if your totally new? You could learn to play either way and the learning curve is the same...Am I understanding this correctly?

Thanks...

Please keep the replies coming, I'm sure there are other people in the situation.
#23
I think electric would be EASIER to learn on and it would probably keep his attention better, with all the effects and what not.
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#24
What you're talking about is the way I started learning. I got a cheap acoustic from Sam Ash with a bag and everything. I like listening to rock and metal, though, and acoustic can't do that. I ended up also getting a squier starter pack, and have been better with practicing lately (I'm currently getting a teacher, also).

Moral of the story: Just start off with an electric starter pack, and if he sticks with it, get him some better stuff. I'm also currently looking to upgrade, so if he does decide to stick with it, the starter pack won't last too long. Be ready.
#25
Well electric is probably easier to start on and if you do go with an acoustic I would go with a steel string. Look into the Yamaha FG series.
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#26
I agree with the guys who say Yamaha. They're good starters, aren't of too bad quality, playable, and you can always upgrade later.

And you're calling your son a n00b?
#27
Yeah, he's really excited in playing the electric guitar and has never played before.

Like in my previous post, I've understood from others that starting off with acoustic and working on the basics was the way to go. Now I'm understanding that it's possible to begin with an electric and since that's the route he wants to take, he might stay motivated when it get difficult for him. Only time will tell.

Now I have to look for an electric that won't break the bank.

If you guys have any suggestion, please let me know...

Thanks
#29
You could get him a simple squier affinity strat:
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Squier-by-Fender-Affinity-Series-Stratocaster-Electric-Guitar-102545738-i1146349.gc

It's a pretty basic starter guitar, and when he gets older he can upgrade/mod (lots of guys mod squiers in the gear building/mods forum)

As for an amp, I'd strongly recommend a roland microcube
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Roland-Micro-Cube-Combo-Amp-481169-i1175936.gc

I have one of these, and I love it. its small, convenient, and it sounds good at the same time.


Then theres the packs..
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Epiphone-SG-Special-Electric-Guitar-Player-Pack-102920451-i1150173.gc
Epiphone SG kit

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Epiphone-Les-Paul-Special-II-Player-Pack-102328770-i1150103.gc
Epiphone Les Paul Special kit

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Squier-by-Fender-Stop-Dreaming--Start-Playing-Affinity-Special-Strat-Pack-With-Fender-Frontman-15G-Amp-104487442-i1175988.gc
Squier Strat pack


Starter kits are pretty safe in my opinion, and you can always upgrade.
#30
At seven, I learned on my father's plastic-backed Applause. Do not buy a small-sized acoustic. That, and I would only pay around $100-200 for one. Nothing changes its mind faster than a 10 year old, so there's no rush to get him a high-end Martin or anything.

I've always been impressed with Epiphone's customer service (they helped me restore my late Uncle's hollowbody from the 60s with information on electronics and part numbers). I've heard horror stories about them, but I've never been steered wrong, personally.

The AJ100 is a fine guitar, actually. I bought this guitar for a girl who's a friend of the family. She's making steady progress learning on it, and looks forward to playing it every day after work.

Edit: If he wants to play electric, LET HIM! Buy him a Squier guitar (telecaster or strat; his choice) and send him on his way. The best thing you could do is to make it interesting for him, and if he's interested in electric, this it the perfect way. A Squier has a standard scale length, but a smaller nut width. This makes it perfect to transition from, but comfortable for smaller hands. The best starter guitar, in my opinion.
Sincerely, Chad.
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Last edited by Chad48309 at May 26, 2008,
#31
Quote by Chad48309
Nothing changes its mind faster than a 10 year old, so there's no rush to get him a high-end Martin or anything...


Adults aren't much slower in changing their minds, either. I, for one, have a completely different pair of guitars from the ones I owned only a month ago. (Geez, I'm getting really bad now.)

Quote by Chad48309
Edit: If he wants to play electric, LET HIM!


I agree. Nothing motivates someone more to play than the equipment that he's happy with. I'm definitely playing a lot more with my new guitars than I had with the onld ones.
#32
Quote by acoustic-fan
Thanks again...good info...

Just wanted to confirm the general thought is, if you want to play electric...start with an acoutic. Does this rule always apply?

Can someone who has never played start with an electric? Will the learning curve be steeper?

Just wanted you get confirmation on this....

Thanks..


Get an electric starter guitar pack (Both Squier and Epiphone make packs that come with a small practice amp and all the necessary equipment like straps and picks) Electric guitars won't be any harder than Acoustic guitars for complete beginners.
#33
Thanks again for the feedback.

I've asked him about acoustic but he's set on electric.

Thanks for everyone for your input... I'll be asking questions on the Electric side of the forum...
#34
I recommend the Ibanez GIO GAX30, I think, my first guitar and I love it. It came very well set up with a low action like I like it, 10 Watt amp, cable, instructional CD (which doesnt help), tunner, strap and gig bag. It is a perfect begginner's guitar, very well built, doesn't go out of tune easyli and i can get almost any tone out of it, withou pedals (blues, grunge, alt rock, classical metal) and it was 189.00 minus taxes

here's the link of the guitar alone i think
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/reviews/electric_guitars/ibanez/gax30/index.html

and on musician's friend
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Ibanez-IJX30-Electric-Guitar-Pack?sku=517552

Mine is a different finish (gloss black), but they're pretty similar. Also the neck is rather thin, which helped me compared to my other friends guitar, and the body is a little smaller than average (although still full size), which helps if the kid is young.
#35
My parents got me a cheap fender acoustic starter kit and I have to say, I didn't enjoy playing it that much (my interest was in rock and roll electric sounds, which I just couldn't get from an acoustic, not to mention it is not the best guitar in the world). As soon as I picked up an electric, my interest fueled itself and I've stuck with it for 2.5 years now. I got a Squier Affinity Strat starter kit and I still play the guitar (which I've replaced the pickups and refinished) today.
#36
Again, IMO don't go with the starter packs. If you shop around, you can find much better equipment for the same/equivelant price. I know you're just looking for somthing basic, but you're also going to want somthing he can grow into if he does get enjoyment out of it. If you cheap out on his first equipment, you'll just be re-buying in a year or two, and it'll make it less enjoyable starting out.

Shop around, do some research, and make an educated decision. You'll thank yourself in the long run.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play