#1
So I've developed this habit of playing lots of patterned diatonic stuff in my improvs, solos, and instrumentals... i.e. Connecting the notes very straightforward and in mainly up/down patterns without many string skips or large interval jumps. My question is what is a good way to break this habbit? I play very quickly, so it isn't an issue when I have to shred or do a speedy solo, but I want to write better melodies for my instrumentals that aren't all speed, legato, or swept.
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#2
My question is what is a good way to break this habbit?
I guess not doing it as much would be one way.

Dont just practice scales in seconds (ABCDEFGA), but also thirds (ACBDCEDFEGFA), fourths and fifths etc. This will allow you to easily make a large jump, and you'll know what it will sound like.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#3
In addition to Prime:

Make little games for yourself. Make yourself play (at a very slow speed) large intervals. When you come up with interesting licks, figure them out, write them down, and use them later. You'll come up for a lot of garbage, but practice is about improving, not already being great.
#4
Quote by Coil_Tapped
So I've developed this habit of playing lots of patterned diatonic stuff in my improvs, solos, and instrumentals... i.e. Connecting the notes very straightforward and in mainly up/down patterns without many string skips or large interval jumps. My question is what is a good way to break this habbit? I play very quickly, so it isn't an issue when I have to shred or do a speedy solo, but I want to write better melodies for my instrumentals that aren't all speed, legato, or swept.



keep in mind you play like you practice. If you practice alot of patterns up and down through the scale, you will likely do that when you improvise/solo as well.

If you feel you lack in the melodic department, try to spend some time focusing on melodies. Listen to them, learn them, practice playing them. Also try and focus more on the ear. Make your note choices come from what you hear, rather than just the muscle memory you develop through scale exercises.
#5
Click the links in my sig as well.

Quote by GuitarMunky
Also try and focus more on the ear. Make your note choices come from what you hear, rather than just the muscle memory you develop through scale exercises.

BING!
#6
Whats with thi new trend in MT advice? Play with your ear stuff. First it was "box shapes are evil (about 1 year back), than it was modes are restrictive...
Quote by Coil_Tapped
So I've developed this habit of playing lots of patterned diatonic stuff in my improvs, solos, and instrumentals... i.e. Connecting the notes very straightforward and in mainly up/down patterns without many string skips or large interval jumps. My question is what is a good way to break this habbit? I play very quickly, so it isn't an issue when I have to shred or do a speedy solo, but I want to write better melodies for my instrumentals that aren't all speed, legato, or swept.
Playing diatonically isn't actually THAT much of a problem. Most of the vocal melody's on the radio, which are normally really catchy and well written, do heaps of single tone diatonic movements.

If you do want to change though, I would suggest for you to play more arpeggios in your improvising and to focus on what intervals your playing.
And play slower, you can put more feeling into a slow song than into a fast one, its by far way easier to play to the best of your musical abilities.

I sort of like what aenimus said, except going up in diatonic thirds means (ACEGBDFA) not (ACBDCEDFEGFA)

And melodic control is definitely a great video to watch, although I think he focuses a little too much on arpeggios...
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
Whats with thi new trend in MT advice? Play with your ear stuff.


I agree with pretty much everything you said, but what's wrong with playing by ear? Music is, after all, an art meant for ears. I was just reading something not too long ago that said:
Mozart, when asked how one would learn to compose: "Here, here, and here (pointing to his ear, his head, and his heart) is your school."
#8
I sort of like what aenimus said, except going up in diatonic thirds means (ACEGBDFA) not (ACBDCEDFEGFA)
So what you call that movement?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
^wait, how did you get those notes? I just know, in C major, A to C is a diatonic third, c to e is a diatonic third and so on.
Quote by knivessout
I agree with pretty much everything you said, but what's wrong with playing by ear? Music is, after all, an art meant for ears. I was just reading something not too long ago that said:
Mozart, when asked how one would learn to compose: "Here, here, and here (pointing to his ear, his head, and his heart) is your school."
You should always play what you know is best (your head), what sounds best (your ear), and what you feel is best (your heart).

But I dont believe anyone of these three factors shouyld become any more or less important than the others. I hear alot of people suggestion more emphasis on one than the other,
#10
wait, how did you get those notes? I just know, in C major, A to C is a diatonic third, c to e is a diatonic third and so on.
A to C is a third, B to D is a third, C to E is a third etc.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums