#1
Ok,
well I've never touched a guitar before, but I'm fanatical about music so I've decided it's about time I learn. I've read as much as possible from this forum over the last couple weeks but still don't know where to start. As far as guitars go I'd like to learn rock/blues first. I've decided I want to spend about $300 for the guitar, and about the same for the amp. These are the guitars I've got in mind...

Squier by Fender Obey HSS Stratocaster Electric Guitar
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Squier-by-Fender-Obey-HSS-Stratocaster-Electric-Guitar-512072-i1147545.gc



Dean Vendetta 1 F Electric Guitar with Floyd Rose(Gloss Natural)
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Dean-Vendetta-1-Electric-Guitar-with-Floyd-Rose?sku=515822



As far as amps go I have NO IDEA where to start... I would really appreciate it if someone could give me some advice on what would go best with these guitars, or if these guitars won't be very good beginner guitars... thanks in advance.

-Dan-
#3
marshall amp dude. try going for a Jackson Dinky or somthing cuz dean's rnt always wat they seem.
#4
dean even if doesn't look as cool it's hella awesome floyd rose two humbuckers nice
#5
amps- if you are willing to spend up to 300 bucks on an amp, check out the vox valvetronix line, or the microcubes. those are pretty good amps to get you started. as far as guitars, i would recommend you go with the squier because tending to a floyd rose as a beginner could be complicated, and could turn out to be a disaster! hopefully that helps!
#6
go with the Dean, and get a small marshall amp, or even a line6 spider III...good practice amps
#7
All of the guitars I currently own have Floyds on them, and they're great. However what kind of person are you? Do you like tinkering with things, are you the type that'll spend hours tweaking or modding things just for kicks? Because the Floyd Rose system is pretty annoying to get set up right, and after that you're limited to a single tuning without a modification to the spring cavity.

I recommend Cort as good beginner guitars because their $300 guitars are pretty good for what they are. The Kramers I've played recently weren't too bad either. As long as it's got a Mahogany, Alder or Basswood body, feels right when you play it (do try it out) then it's awesome. Pickups and hardware you can update at a later date without much modification at all.

The Ibanez SA series are brilliant, if you can get them for that much.
Marty
#8
Quote by Mgllpz09
marshall amp dude. try going for a Jackson Dinky or somthing cuz dean's rnt always wat they seem.


you're not going to get anything but an mg for under 300 bucks. are you trying to help him have the worst tone ever?
#9
go for the dean, and fender make a badass amp, also, behringer make a decent amp for a great price, so give them a look too, good luck on your path to guitardom bro
#11
There are loads of quality instruments for that price range. That Squeir pictured is good. the Dean... not so good. I second the Valvetronix series amps. My Vox AD30VT is brilliant and will cope with band practise as well as standard bedroom practise. It also has enough effects and varying sounds to occupy a guitarists growing need for new options.
I woulnd't suggest getting a guitar with a Floyd Rose system (that is a particular type of bridge or saddle that holds the strings in place. Can you notice the difference between the Fender and the Dean. The fender has a standard tremelo system while the Dean has a more complicated Floyd Rose.) When I teach a new student guitar and he is asking what guitar to buy I say these simple things...

Buy a guitar that is cheap

Don't buy anything complicated or anything you don't understand (if it looks weird... it is weird)

Make sure you check with me first before buying! (Obviously you don't have to do that mate but you know what I mean)

Ibanez, ESP, Fender, Epiphone, Cort, BC Rich all make good decent first time guitars.
#12
wow... I guess i didn't realize how fast this forum is lol. Thanks for all the help. I'm glad people talked about how the Dean can be complicated... Considering it's my first guitar I'd rather spend more time trying to learn how to play than trying to learn how to set it up! I appreciate all the responses.. aznmetalhead93 why did you suggest that guitar? any reason? I would just like to know what makes it better?
#13
Quote by AngryGoldfish
There are loads of quality instruments for that price range. That Squeir pictured is good. the Dean... not so good. I second the Valvetronix series amps. My Vox AD30VT is brilliant and will cope with band practise as well as standard bedroom practise. It also has enough effects and varying sounds to occupy a guitarists growing need for new options.
I woulnd't suggest getting a guitar with a Floyd Rose system (that is a particular type of bridge or saddle that holds the strings in place. Can you notice the difference between the Fender and the Dean. The fender has a standard tremelo system while the Dean has a more complicated Floyd Rose.) When I teach a new student guitar and he is asking what guitar to buy I say these simple things...

Buy a guitar that is cheap

Don't buy anything complicated or anything you don't understand (if it looks weird... it is weird)

Make sure you check with me first before buying! (Obviously you don't have to do that mate but you know what I mean)

Ibanez, ESP, Fender, Epiphone, Cort, BC Rich all make good decent first time guitars.


Thanks for the reply... Yea, after reading everyone's responses Ii think the Dean is out... lol. I'm gonna keep look for differant guitars, but I really like the squier, i held one the other day and it just kinda "felt" right too. Thanks for the info on amps!
#14
Quote by thfc1799
wow... I guess i didn't realize how fast this forum is lol. Thanks for all the help. I'm glad people talked about how the Dean can be complicated... Considering it's my first guitar I'd rather spend more time trying to learn how to play than trying to learn how to set it up! I appreciate all the responses.. aznmetalhead93 why did you suggest that guitar? any reason? I would just like to know what makes it better?


Simply because I feel that it's the best guitar for the price. It's just my opinion. You're going to have to try it out in order to form your own opinion about it.
#15
Quote by aznmetalhead93
Simply because I feel that it's the best guitar for the price. It's just my opinion. You're going to have to try it out in order to form your own opinion about it.


cool. An just so you know I wasn't questioning your choice, when I asked for a reason I hope I didn't sound conceited. I appreciate your response
#16
i really dont like the headstock on the squier...doesnt match
i would swap it out, or keep it if you like it

if it wasnt for that i would say 100% on the squier (like 95% otherwise lol)
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LET'S GO BUCKS
#18
Quote by thfc1799
Thanks for the reply... Yea, after reading everyone's responses Ii think the Dean is out... lol. I'm gonna keep look for differant guitars, but I really like the squier, i held one the other day and it just kinda "felt" right too. Thanks for the info on amps!



The Suier's are renowned for having a quality and comfortable feel to them. Its like they were the original guitar and we have inbuilt attraction and link to them! My first electric was a Squier... did the job perfectly.
#19
You have to go out to a guitar store, pick a few guitars and try them out. You can't base your decision based on what anyone here or anywhere else tells you - base it on what you like the feel and sound of best.

Unless you really have your heart set on a tremello, i would recommend against getting on on your first guitar. I think you'll find that you won't be using it much as you learn, and they tend to be irritating when it comes to restringing and retuning your guitar, and can cause your guitar to go out of tune more frequently.
Quote by BeefWellington

what's the point in being "philiosophical"?

Interesting question...
#20
Quote by Vornik
You have to go out to a guitar store, pick a few guitars and try them out. You can't base your decision based on what anyone here or anywhere else tells you - base it on what you like the feel and sound of best.

Unless you really have your heart set on a tremello, i would recommend against getting on on your first guitar. I think you'll find that you won't be using it much as you learn, and they tend to be irritating when it comes to restringing and retuning your guitar, and can cause your guitar to go out of tune more frequently.



but how do you try it out if you don't know how to play? I don't even know anyone that plays?
#21
Just pick them up and hold them. Find the most comfortable body style and the best feeling neck for your hands. I would look at some epiphones. I've found for a $300 epiphones are usually the best.(at least the ones i've tried.)
#22
Quote by thfc1799
but how do you try it out if you don't know how to play? I don't even know anyone that plays?



Thats well funny mate, can I qoute it maybe please!? If no one is offended of course? I know what the guy was saying above but it is important to recieve help from more experience people because how do you know that what you have your hand is correct and actually works. Here are a few simple things to look out for when purchasing a guitar:

1) Check the neck profile by standing it up straight and peering down the neck at a perfect angle with the body. If the neck is contoured or bent in any way, ask the clerk why. If he does not know, don't buy it. If he tells you, thats standard issue, then ask another guy for help. He could be trying to pull one over you (unlikely but you never know)

2) Make sure all the pickups and pickup positions are working. The pickup selector is a little switch near the round knobs (volume controls) which designates a certain pickup (each pickup, whether three, two, or one have different tonal capacities). Make sure that when each pickup is selected, there is no severe crackling or disturbanace. And of course make sure theres sound coming out.

3) Check all components, like the buttons that hold the strap in place. If there loose, ask the clerk to tighten them, its easily done. Double check the frets (they are the little steal bars that run across the fretboard, normally there are 22 or 24. The Squier has 22 while the Dean has 24, for instance.) making sure that they aren't petruding in any awkward fashion or are sharp. Try and place any misgivings in the tuning heads at the top or head of the guitar (they are called tuning heads as they hold the strings taught and retain the ability to tune your guitar) Any loose fittings or uncalculated mistakes, such as five machine heads but six strings. Anything simple like that.

4) Try and buy in a store that is well respected and has nice staff

5) Test the guitar in amplifier you are most likely to buy. Do not try it out in a 3000 euro Mesa Boogie, unless you plan on buying it! Anything that may discourage from playing like that could be annoying. You could here the staff play your guitar of choice on an expensive amp and be wowed, but then get home with a far cheaper model and it sounds aweful. Even if a good player is wielding it.

6) Make sure you buy a strap, numerous different gauges of picks (plectrums) and two spare packs of strings (often guitars on show in show rooms have very old strings and need replacing. The store clerk may do that for you if you want it so) Ask for 0.9 gauge pack and a 0.10 pack. If you buy one, buy the .9 pack, they are lighter on your fingers and easier to play.
Ensure all attachments are in the package such as, Whammy bar (that is a steal rod that adjusts the tension of the bridge and coinciding strings), straps, string winders, volume pots, selector switches, and anything else that may be necessary.

There are many other things to worry about but to be honest, don't worry about them! Just enjoy buying your first guitar.
#23
Quote by AngryGoldfish
Thats well funny mate, can I qoute it maybe please!? If no one is offended of course? I know what the guy was saying above but it is important to recieve help from more experience people because how do you know that what you have your hand is correct and actually works. Here are a few simple things to look out for when purchasing a guitar:

1) Check the neck profile by standing it up straight and peering down the neck at a perfect angle with the body. If the neck is contoured or bent in any way, ask the clerk why. If he does not know, don't buy it. If he tells you, thats standard issue, then ask another guy for help. He could be trying to pull one over you (unlikely but you never know)

2) Make sure all the pickups and pickup positions are working. The pickup selector is a little switch near the round knobs (volume controls) which designates a certain pickup (each pickup, whether three, two, or one have different tonal capacities). Make sure that when each pickup is selected, there is no severe crackling or disturbanace. And of course make sure theres sound coming out.

3) Check all components, like the buttons that hold the strap in place. If there loose, ask the clerk to tighten them, its easily done. Double check the frets (they are the little steal bars that run across the fretboard, normally there are 22 or 24. The Squier has 22 while the Dean has 24, for instance.) making sure that they aren't petruding in any awkward fashion or are sharp. Try and place any misgivings in the tuning heads at the top or head of the guitar (they are called tuning heads as they hold the strings taught and retain the ability to tune your guitar) Any loose fittings or uncalculated mistakes, such as five machine heads but six strings. Anything simple like that.

4) Try and buy in a store that is well respected and has nice staff

5) Test the guitar in amplifier you are most likely to buy. Do not try it out in a 3000 euro Mesa Boogie, unless you plan on buying it! Anything that may discourage from playing like that could be annoying. You could here the staff play your guitar of choice on an expensive amp and be wowed, but then get home with a far cheaper model and it sounds aweful. Even if a good player is wielding it.

6) Make sure you buy a strap, numerous different gauges of picks (plectrums) and two spare packs of strings (often guitars on show in show rooms have very old strings and need replacing. The store clerk may do that for you if you want it so) Ask for 0.9 gauge pack and a 0.10 pack. If you buy one, buy the .9 pack, they are lighter on your fingers and easier to play.
Ensure all attachments are in the package such as, Whammy bar (that is a steal rod that adjusts the tension of the bridge and coinciding strings), straps, string winders, volume pots, selector switches, and anything else that may be necessary.

There are many other things to worry about but to be honest, don't worry about them! Just enjoy buying your first guitar.


I REALLY appreciate not only the time it took you to type this but the amount of great info also! As for the quote, you're more than welcome to it.
#25
Dude, since you're a beginner I would be against a floating bridge, trust me, you'll get frustrated since you're a beginner, and we don't want that.
Get a Yamaha Pacifica Strat, best bang for the buck for a beginner. Specially since you're going to rock/blues, a strat would be best for you. for an amp, well, tell us first what your TOTAL price range is.

http://www.google.com/products?q=yamaha+pacifica&oe=utf-8&scoring=p&lnk=pruser&price1=99&price2=&btnP=Go
Amps:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Peavey-ValveKing-Royal-8-Tube-Guitar-Combo-Amp?sku=481661
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Epiphone-Valve-Junior-Combo-Amp?sku=480260
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Crate-V-Series-V5-5W-1x10-Tube-Guitar-Combo-Amp?sku=487050

Guitar:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-PAC012-Electric-Guitar?sku=511076
Or just choose the ones on the Google link.
Quote by rastaman12
What do people usually do after they **** their sisters?
Last edited by Lucky#Slevin at May 25, 2008,
#26
Quote by thfc1799
as far as stings are concerned, who makes the best?


Once again, it's all about your personal preference. I personally like Ernie Balls 10-52's the most, but like I said before, you'll have to try out various brands and gauges you decide which is best.
Last edited by aznmetalhead93 at May 26, 2008,
#27
Quote by Lucky#Slevin
Dude, since you're a beginner I would be against a floating bridge, trust me, you'll get frustrated since you're a beginner, and we don't want that.
Get a Yamaha Pacifica Strat, best bang for the buck for a beginner. Specially since you're going to rock/blues, a strat would be best for you. for an amp, well, tell us first what your TOTAL price range is.

http://www.google.com/products?q=yamaha+pacifica&oe=utf-8&scoring=p&lnk=pruser&price1=99&price2=&btnP=Go
Amps:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Peavey-ValveKing-Royal-8-Tube-Guitar-Combo-Amp?sku=481661
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Epiphone-Valve-Junior-Combo-Amp?sku=480260
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Crate-V-Series-V5-5W-1x10-Tube-Guitar-Combo-Amp?sku=487050

Guitar:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-PAC012-Electric-Guitar?sku=511076
Or just choose the ones on the Google link.

+1
Quote by 666_Pounder
If you don't have enough for tube get a Roland Cube.


Equipment:
Fender Squire Fat Strat Affinity series
Some cheap amp....
#28
Quote by thfc1799
I REALLY appreciate not only the time it took you to type this but the amount of great info also! As for the quote, you're more than welcome to it.



No probs mate. I use D'Addario strings. o.10's, 0.9's, and 0.11's. I sometimes use Ernie Ball heavy gauge strings for certain guitars. But basically, all strings will do the job and there are no strings that are bad, its just personal preference. And seeing as your a beginner, just buy the pack of strings the store clerk advises.
#29
I think I'm gonna go with Ernie balls super slinky's... a lot of people have suggested them?
#31
Quote by thfc1799
I think I'm gonna go with Ernie balls super slinky's... a lot of people have suggested them?



Good choice, go for it and enjoy your guitar hunting! If you need any help once you have bought the guitar, send me a message.
#33
Quote by DeanESPJackson
For an amp, I would consider the Crate V-series tube amps (http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Crate-V-Series-V18112-18W-1x12-Tube-Guitar-Combo-Amp?sku=487051), you can pick it up at just over $300, and it should give you plenty of oomph as a beginner. Your running tubes within a pretty straight forward design that will handle future effects pedal additions well.



Thanks for the heads up, ill have a look.
#34
Quote by AngryGoldfish
Good choice, go for it and enjoy your guitar hunting! If you need any help once you have bought the guitar, send me a message.



thanks, i appreciate it.