#1
Well, Ive been playing for a while now and every time I play I just can not help but noticing the extreme difference between the sounds my fingers make when strumming. The callous on my first finger is such that it makes a much for metallic twang sound when compared to the less used and less powerful second finger which makes more of a thud sound. The third finger (which I just recently started using) just sounds ridiculous!

Anyone have comments or experience to share on the matter? ^^
#2
slap?
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#3
you must be using more strength to push down on the strings.
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#5
how close are you to the bridge? I play right up near the bridge (within an inch) and I find the sound changes drastically also when I use 2 fingers- I developed a forefinger backstroke to counteract it. However, if you don't care where you play, I'd just move up towards the neck.
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HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#6
haha its just that my first finger is calloused from the use so it makes more of a harder sound that a soft or cushy finger
#8
then play till you lose a finger!
the only way to equalize it is balancing out them fingers.
go learn Happy Birthday, that'll be useful, and you can use your pillowfinger on it.

EDIT: JRF could be onto sumtin...
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#9
could it be the angle that I am hitting the string with the fingers? possible that I don't compensate for the difference in length?
#11
I think the angle at which your fingers make contact with the strings is imporant since the index and middle fingers are, after all, different in length. Plucking with fingers directly perpendicular to the strings causes akward bending of the middle finger, making it difficult to play with a relaxed extended hand.

If you look at traditional upright players, they approach the strings on a diagonal. Similarly, classical fingerstyle guitarists angle the instrument at 45 degrees to accomodate ergonomic technique.

Continue to practice alternate plucking and focus on achieving a light touch -- your tone will become more round and consistent. What I find tricky is getting consistent response across all strings, especially D and G, which give little bounce.

American Stratocaster + Blues Junior