#1
After having played guitar for a few years now, I'm familiar with the plateaus that one goes through along the road to improvement, but up until now, all of my ruts have been pretty simple to get past. I would learn a new song, technique, or scale that would really inspire me to get to playing/practicing more and I would start to improve again.

For the past few weeks however, I have been stuck in one of the largest ruts that I have been in since picking up the guitar.

I mean, it's not that I don't practice enough; I'm on my summer break and I have had loads of time...

I have had some people tell me it's because I'm finally making the transition from being a somewhat intermediate player to a more advanced one (although I would say it's more like finally moving from beginner to intermediate)

I know that a guitarist's education is never complete, but as for right now, I'm not sure where exactly I should head in order to kickstart my playing and get out of this rut.

I guess what I'm asking for is a bit of direction...

I know my basic theory, I can use the modes (to some degree anyway...) and all that type of stuff.

Would memorizing every note on the fretboard help with this, perhaps?
#2
Brushing up on your theory is always a good idea.

You could also try listening to different genres of music

I don't know if memorizing all the notes on the board is enough to get you out of a rut but it is something you should definitely do.

If you're not doing it already try writing some of your own songs.

Try some alternate tuning that you don't usually use. Open tunings sound really good acoustic, or a really low drop tuning if you have a good set of strings.

Hope any of this helps.
rock on
#3
It looks like you might be a bit misinformed as to what music theory is...you can't know ANY theory unless you know the notes on the fretboard. You'd be better off assuming that you don'r know any theory and starting again at the beginning...learn the notes on the fretboard then learn the major scale and it's intervals.

Learning a scale pattern is not theory, theory is what's going on behind that...how different notes interact with each other, how to form chords and play over them etc. Forget modes for the time being, from what you've posted you won't have learned what they actually are or when they apply. They're not that important or useful anyway, the major scale is the focal point for western music theory. After the major scale the major scale is the most useful scale for a guitartist to know, and arguably more useful in practical terms for a rock guitarist. After those their pentatonic variants are again commonly used, but that's just the same scale less 2 notes so it's easy to implement.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Alright, well it looks like I've got my work cut out for me. Thanks guys.
#5
Perhaps what would help most is to have something to aim for - a goal. Practice for the sake of practice can be very demotivating - how do you know when you've done what you set out to acheive? How will you know you've improved?

Set yourself a goal and work towards that - it could be a gig or technique or anything really. Also you needn't limit yourself to small improvements - set yourself a big goal and make tiny steps towards it each day - you're much more likely to improve this way than via hours of aimless shedding.
#6
Quote by eds1275
After having played guitar for a few years now, I'm familiar with the plateaus that one goes through along the road to improvement, but up until now, all of my ruts have been pretty simple to get past. I would learn a new song, technique, or scale that would really inspire me to get to playing/practicing more and I would start to improve again.

For the past few weeks however, I have been stuck in one of the largest ruts that I have been in since picking up the guitar.

I mean, it's not that I don't practice enough; I'm on my summer break and I have had loads of time...

I have had some people tell me it's because I'm finally making the transition from being a somewhat intermediate player to a more advanced one (although I would say it's more like finally moving from beginner to intermediate)

I know that a guitarist's education is never complete, but as for right now, I'm not sure where exactly I should head in order to kickstart my playing and get out of this rut.

I guess what I'm asking for is a bit of direction...

I know my basic theory, I can use the modes (to some degree anyway...) and all that type of stuff.

Would memorizing every note on the fretboard help with this, perhaps?



Ruts happen. For me its always a matter of inspiration. I always make the most progress with guitar when im inspired to play it.

There are times when I'm simply burnt from playing so much. In that case a break usually does the trick. I'll just not play for a few days, and take that time to focus on other things. Eventually I see the guitar and its like "damn I want to play" !!!! [ /rut]

Sometimes listening to new music can help. I'll try to find something I've never heard before, or listen deeper to something I already know. Just listening and enjoying can be very motivating.


anyway, ruts happen to everyone. In most cases they come and go. Don't worry too much. If you truly love playing, that desire will come back to you.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 27, 2008,