#2
So you just started hey...

Learn the pentatonic minor/major in 2 or 3 postitions. Practise moving around and try to copy your guitar heroes phrasing. Pentatonic masturbation is really good, IMO, for begginers.
Try to play slowly and meaningfully, I hear all too ofter improvising begginers say they hate their solo's, than I see them playing without meaning or any real phrasing.

Just another helpfull hint when your masturbating (lol), try to phrase your improv from a person singing. This is pretty much how the early bluesmen did their improv.

Once you got your technique and phrasing ready, learn about intervals. Try to figure out what intervals sound like what. And watch melodic control, great vid, but only made sense to me when I applied my knowledge of intervals to what he was saying.
Try to think in intervals and learn what intervals make up the pentatonic scale. Think in intervals when you improvise, even when your using pentatonics.

Than learn the major scale, its intervals, and about harmonic/melodic consonance and dissonance.
Last edited by demonofthenight at May 26, 2008,
#4
Quote by flipthatchicken
"play a wrong note once, its a mistake. play it twice, its jazz" - Miles Davis
But deliberatly play that wrong note, and play it meaningfully, and your a genious
#5
Every time I hit "a wrong note" in a song, regardless of the setting....whether on stage, or in my living room, I repeat it again (unless it just plain don't fit), as if I intended the note.

It's amazing how many deviations I can take in a song, particularly in a song that is "new" and unheard, from city to city, and nobody notices!

Popping a string is a neat "wrong note!!"
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT
Last edited by Soupy1957 at May 26, 2008,
#6
Improvised phrasing can go very well or very badly. I would support the idea of basing it around a vocal idea. Some people use phrasing only when their fingers are getting tired and otherwise shred endlessly. I hate these people.

If you have good legato and vibrato then your improvisation can go very well. Just pick the scale to play in and let it flow. When you want to speed things up, use legato, to slow things down use vibrato. Keeps things interesting and, when you're a beginner, it can give you a hint as to the proper uses of those techniques. After all, they're not just for solo.
#7
Quote by colohue
Improvised phrasing can go very well or very badly. I would support the idea of basing it around a vocal idea. Some people use phrasing only when their fingers are getting tired and otherwise shred endlessly. I hate these people.
Thats a very negative aproach. Sure there are some mindless shredders (zakk wylde), but guys like gambole and di meola and satriani and even malmsteen show you can shred meaningfully and nicely.

Shred can be phrased. As I remember it, it's normally phrased like this: fast, rest, slow, rest, fast, rest and so on.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Thats a very negative aproach. Sure there are some mindless shredders (zakk wylde), but guys like gambole and di meola and satriani and even malmsteen show you can shred meaningfully and nicely.

Shred can be phrased. As I remember it, it's normally phrased like this: fast, rest, slow, rest, fast, rest and so on.


The negativity was around people who only phrase when they're not shredding, basically they stick vibrato on a note so that they can take a breath.
#11
Quote by the_poison125
Ive tried improv a few times but i always sounds like crap.

I know a few scales and stuff. Any tips?



Spend some time learning what good improvisers do.

1) learn solos (mimic as closely as you can and capture every possible nuance)
2) study the solo ..(scales, chord progression, phrasing.........ect)


at the very least do #1. You can get alot of mileage out of that alone. if you have the desire and background for it, try # 2 as well