#1
After I started actually learning the stuff I write, I realized, yes, they are great riffs and solos, but they are arranged terribly (except for like 2 random ones...), now, how do you arrange songs? Riff structures and all that... I have really really good riffs, but I have no idea on how to link them up, it just sounds like a random change... And how do I structure riffs for a verse, a chorus, interlude bridge and stuff?

I've tried analyzing other songs structures but I realized I had no idea what I was actually looking for...

And, how do you arrange them yourself? Also, this is more for Progy Metal stuff, and other not so Progy Metal. :P
#2
^ generally what i do is take and just play connect the dots. i'm going to give a simple example here in E minor

lets say i have 3 parts i really like and want to put them together (and you can substitute 3 for as many as you want, im just doing 3 to keep it short)

pt 1. - the excessively used Em , Em, D,C

pt 2 - Bm G D Em

pt 3 - Em, C, G, D

what i'll then do is take and figure out what parts could go where. i know that Bm is the 5th of Em so i could take and link them together like such

intro - Bm G D Em
verse -Em, C, G, D
chorus - Em , Em,D, C

or

verse - Em, C, G,D
chorus - Bm, G D Em
verse again
bridge - Em, Em, D, C

really it all depends on how you want to do it.

NOW if you're going to do key changes theres lots of ways to go about doing that too. i recommend the reading the music theory sticky to get some ideas on that because i could go into long pages and walls of texts of ideas.
#3
What's the reasoning of putting the Em progression after the B progression? Are you ordering things compared to the root or...?

Also, how do you actually make a riff out of a chord progression, I don't really see how you can make a cool riff out of a chord progression, like the main riff to Painkiller...
#4
Quote by Veqq
What's the reasoning of putting the Em progression after the B progression? Are you ordering things compared to the root or...?

Also, how do you actually make a riff out of a chord progression, I don't really see how you can make a cool riff out of a chord progression, like the main riff to Painkiller...


Pretty much anything fits into a chord progression
#5
Quote by Veqq
What's the reasoning of putting the Em progression after the B progression? Are you ordering things compared to the root or...?

Also, how do you actually make a riff out of a chord progression, I don't really see how you can make a cool riff out of a chord progression, like the main riff to Painkiller...


the B progression is still in E, it just starts on the B. also theres a "magical" relationship between the 1-4-5 of notes, so you could go from Am - Em or Em - Am or Bm - Em or Em - Bm.

theres not really a massive amount of rules in arranging in modern rock music. it kinda just follows the aural rule of thumb which is "if it sounds good, then do it"
#6
Damn... That means I'll pretty much waste my summer listing to watch tower, exodus and overkill and maybe some random NWOBHM band and just an analyze their songs for the reasoning they do everything... :/ And then I shall have a system...

hahha

But thanks.
#7
^ thats pretty much all i do. listen to and learn songs and see how other people arrange their stuff and figure out how it works.
#8
Try writing a peice in sonata form. Which I think is: Intro, Exposition, Developement, Recapitulation, and Coda.
Intro: frequently focuses on the dominant key
Exposition:
1. First subject group – this consists of one or more themes, all of them in the home key, so if the piece is in C major, all of the music in the first group will be in C major.

3. Second subject group – one or more themes in a different key from the first group. If the first group is in a major key, the second group will usually be the perfect fifth higher; if the original key is C major, for example, the key of the music of the second group will be G major. If the first group is in a minor key, the second group will generally be in the relative major, so that if the original key is C minor, the second group will be in E flat major. The material of the second group is often different in rhythm or mood from that of the first group (frequently, it is more lyrical).

4. Codetta – the purpose of this is to bring the exposition section to a close with a perfect cadence in the same key as the second group. Often the codetta contains a sequence of themes, each of which arrives at a perfect authentic cadence.

Developement: The development generally starts in the same key as the exposition ended, and may move through many different keys during its course. It will usually consist of one or more themes from the exposition altered and occasionally juxtaposed and may include new material or themes – though exactly what is acceptable practice is a famous point of contention. Alterations include taking material through distant keys, breaking down of themes and sequencing of motifs, and so forth.

Racapitualtion:
1. First subject group – normally given prominence as the highlight of a recapitulation, it is usually in exactly the same key and form as in the exposition.

2. Transition – now altered so that it does not change key, but remains in the piece's home key

3. Second subject group and codetta – usually in roughly the same form as in the exposition, but now in the home key, which sometimes involves transformation from major to minor, or vice versa.

Coda: After the final cadence of the recapitulation, the movement may continue with a coda, which will contain material from the movement proper. Codas, when present, vary considerably in length, but, like introductions, are not part of the "argument" of the work. The coda will end, however, with a perfect cadence in the home key.

Ripped from Wikipedia
#9
I like that... Allot... It gives me many ideas.

+2

Further more, it led me to the wiki that you ripped it from, and from there I searched musical form, and that is a gold mine...