#1
So i have this progression and it sounds good to me but i wanna take it further. change key possibly and take it to new heights.
Currently its Am - Cadd9 - G - G#dim

Gimme some tips anyone?
The one legged chickens from outer space made me do it!
#2
Quote by Maggot4eva
So i have this progression and it sounds good to me but i wanna take it further. change key possibly and take it to new heights.
Currently its Am - Cadd9 - G - G#dim

Gimme some tips anyone?
Your next chord could be F#m.

Here's my idea:
Am - Cadd9 - G - G#dim7 - Am - Cadd9 - G - G#dim7
F#m - Aadd9 - E - F*dim7 - F#m - Aadd9 - E - F*dim7

And then repeat the whole thing.

I'm going to use this somewhere, so don't get pissed when you hear "your" progression on the radio!


I'm assuming that many people will wonder how I came up with this. Feel free to ask, but I won't explain without being asked to.


* F* is not weird notation I just made up. The chord should be called E#dim7 since you can't have F and F# in the same scale. However, I'd rather not think of E#; F is much easier to work with and is perfectly fine in a informal setting.
#4
How did you change it?
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#5
Quote by evening_crow
How did you change it?
Ahh, yes, someone asked.


A diminished chord often resolves to a chord one half-step higher, so G#dim7 resolves nicely to Am. However, diminished chords are symmetrical; that is, G#dim7 contains the same notes as E#dim7 (Fdim7), Ddim7, and Bdim7. I approached the second G#dim7 chord as an inversion of E#dim7 in my first example and resolved it up a half step to F#m. Then I resolved the second F*dim7 to Am for the same reason.

My other progression follows the same idea.
#6
Though that completely confused me thanks for explaining.

I have some studying to do now haha...
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote

I'm going to use this somewhere, so don't get pissed when you hear "your" progression on the radio!
.


just tune down half a step or slap a capo on the guitar and then its all yours.
#9
You could also unjustifiably move it up a half step/whole step/minor third.

Better idea would be that in addition to those minor keys BGC mentioned, you can modulate to their parallel major keys(A, C, Eb, F#). It'll be a little different but it could work.

Additionally, you could change the G#dim7's tonality. For instance, follow it up with a G#7 and have that resolve to C#(major OR minor) through simple V I(or V i) motion. So Am - Cadd9 - G - G#dim - G#7 - C#m etc. etc. Now, due to the symmetrical nature of diminished chords, this can also be moved around in minor thirds. Thus, you could do B7 E, D7 G, F7 Bb as well. This is just an idea and will hopefully get you thinking.
#12
So yeah, i have another little trixie for you all to dwell on
Goes:

Am - F - G/D - Bm6

The last chord could be a G#dim/B depends which way you look at it.

Any ideas on the best way to take the tune away off of the last chord?
The one legged chickens from outer space made me do it!
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Bm6-Bdim7-Cm.
I like that, I might use that. Alot of downward semitonal movement between the Bm6 and Bdim7 though. A bit weird but the resolution to the Cm makes up for it.

If you hear that on the radio...
#15
Quote by demonofthenight
but the resolution to the Cm makes up for it.
That's the point of dissonance, so when you get back to your resolved chord, everything sounds "right" again.
#16
the best way to change the key is to use the dominant of the new in the old key and then the tonic of the new key - wahla