#1
My acoustic just seems impossibly hard to barre around the 1st-2nd frets. I'm trying to play some of the chords from the song "haunting" by anberlin and in this one particular progression:


Chorus

e--3--x--|--x--x--|
B--3--3--|--3--3--|
G--5--2--|--4--2--|
D--5--0--|--2--0--|
A--3--0--|--2--0--|
D--x--0--|--2--0--|


the 22243x chord is murder on my index finger to get the A string to ring out. I recently got tendon strain in my index last week and now that my finger is almost back to normal, I'm trying to slowly work back up to working on these. I can do it if I press really damn hard but I think thats dumb and I'll just re-injure myself.

My strings are: 12-16-24-32-42-42-53

I haven't played many other acoustics, but the other ones seem easier to play, but they don't sound as good as mine
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Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#2
You have quite heavy strings, maybe it will be easier if you lower to 11's or 10's
#4
its probably your strings then. use strings of lighter gauge and there should be less tension.
#5
Two questions: are lighter strings a good idea if I don't have a truss rod? is it easier to tune up lighter strings (I tune my G up to A on these elixirs with no breaks sofar) without breaking?

I kinda like the full tone I get from my acoustic too. My first electric gets here on Wednesday, so maybe I should just play the harder songs on that and stick with my nice sounding 12's
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#6
.012's are NOT heavy strings for an acoustic. Matter of fact, they're lights. If we were talking about electrics, then they would be considered heavy gauge.
Stick it out and it will get easier. Acoustics require a different degree of hand strength than electrics do. But they are oh so worth it when you get them down.
You might want to invest in a GripMaster. Used properly, you could see results in as little as a week. If you do get one, I'd suggest the medium tension red one.
#7
Quote by mlfarrell
Two questions: are lighter strings a good idea if I don't have a truss rod? is it easier to tune up lighter strings (I tune my G up to A on these elixirs with no breaks sofar) without breaking?

I kinda like the full tone I get from my acoustic too. My first electric gets here on Wednesday, so maybe I should just play the harder songs on that and stick with my nice sounding 12's


What makes you think you don't have a truss rod? If it's a recent generation of steel string guitar, then it will have one. It will be adjustable either from under a cover plate on the headstock, or tucked up under the end of the fingerboard just inside the soundhole. Nylon string classicals normally don't require a truss rod. But then again, some do have them.
G to A is only 1 full step up, so the majority of strings out there should be able to handle the extra stretch. If you're going to be wanting to do this often, then try to do it early on in the strings lifespan. Later on they will be come less stretchy, and more prone to snapping.
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
What makes you think you don't have a truss rod? If it's a recent generation of steel string guitar, then it will have one. It will be adjustable either from under a cover plate on the headstock, or tucked up under the end of the fingerboard just inside the soundhole. Nylon string classicals normally don't require a truss rod. But then again, some do have them.
G to A is only 1 full step up, so the majority of strings out there should be able to handle the extra stretch. If you're going to be wanting to do this often, then try to do it early on in the strings lifespan. Later on they will be come less stretchy, and more prone to snapping.


Fair enough, I don't have a cover but I looked under the fingerboard through the soundhole and I see something thats adjustable. Hmmm I didn't know that I had one
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#9
Yep, that's where you adjust the truss rod for that guitar. Now that you know it's there, please don't just go and start cranking away on it. It's a precisely engineered adjustment point on acoustics, and if done wrong, could wreck your guitar in no time flat. The primary reason for the truss rod is to counteract the excess tension created by steel strings on the neck. The truss will pull against that string tension keeping the neck straight. Without it, the neck would curve inward on itself from the pull of the strings. It'd be like trying to play a banana with strings on it.
#10
Quote by LeftyDave
Yep, that's where you adjust the truss rod for that guitar. Now that you know it's there, please don't just go and start cranking away on it. It's a precisely engineered adjustment point on acoustics, and if done wrong, could wreck your guitar in no time flat. The primary reason for the truss rod is to counteract the excess tension created by steel strings on the neck. The truss will pull against that string tension keeping the neck straight. Without it, the neck would curve inward on itself from the pull of the strings. It'd be like trying to play a banana with strings on it.


lmao don't worry. I wouldn't touch that thing if you paid me. My action is high but its fine
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#11
Good boy. Now turn off your computer and go play your guitar! lol