#1
i understand the major and minor progressions for chords,

( I ii iii IV V vi vii-dim) and all that,

but does the same progressions apply when using 7th chords, 9th chords and diffrent types of chords other then major and minor?
#2
The root, third, and 5th must stay the same. After that, you can use extensions, but you have to use the right one. In C major, Cmaj9 (1 3 5 7 9, C E G B D) fits in the key while C9 (1 3 5 b7 9, C E G Bb D) does not.
#3
its very simple - a 7th chord is playing a chord a third up over the original chord. ie. in C, a I 7th chord is Em over C. giving a major 7th. 9ths are made from chords a fifth up, ie G chord over C, giving a major 9th.

for the V chord, G, you're playing a B half diminished chord, which contains a b5 or tritone, over G, which creates the familiar tenseness of a dominant 7th chord.

This is the general pattern for creating 7ths and 9ths. the major scale harmonised is:

Imaj9 iim9 iiim7b9 IVmaj9 V9 viim9 viidim7b9
#4
Quote by Declan87
its very simple - a 7th chord is playing a chord a third up over the original chord. ie. in C, a I 7th chord is Em over C. giving a major 7th. 9ths are made from chords a fifth up, ie G chord over C, giving a major 9th.

for the V chord, G, you're playing a B half diminished chord, which contains a b5 or tritone, over G, which creates the familiar tenseness of a dominant 7th chord.

This is the general pattern for creating 7ths and 9ths. the major scale harmonised is:

Imaj9 iim9 iiim7b9 IVmaj9 V9 viim9 viidim7b9
What the jolly fuck are you talking about?
#5
Quote by Declan87
its very simple - a 7th chord is playing a chord a third up over the original chord. ie. in C, a I 7th chord is Em over C. giving a major 7th. 9ths are made from chords a fifth up, ie G chord over C, giving a major 9th.

for the V chord, G, you're playing a B half diminished chord, which contains a b5 or tritone, over G, which creates the familiar tenseness of a dominant 7th chord.

This is the general pattern for creating 7ths and 9ths. the major scale harmonised is:

Imaj9 iim9 iiim7b9 IVmaj9 V9 viim9 viidim7b9
While that...sort of works, it's generally better to see them as what they are: chords that with more extended degrees than triads. So just as a major chord is 1 3 5, a major 7th chord is 1 3 5 7(ninth is 1 3 5 7 9 etc. etc.).

TS, you're correct. If you're not already familiar with the types of 7th chords (minor, major, dominant, diminished, half diminished) please become familiar with them.
#6
Quote by Declan87
its very simple - a 7th chord is playing a chord a third up over the original chord. ie. in C, a I 7th chord is Em over C. giving a major 7th. 9ths are made from chords a fifth up, ie G chord over C, giving a major 9th.

for the V chord, G, you're playing a B half diminished chord, which contains a b5 or tritone, over G, which creates the familiar tenseness of a dominant 7th chord.

This is the general pattern for creating 7ths and 9ths. the major scale harmonised is:

Imaj9 iim9 iiim7b9 IVmaj9 V9 viim9 viidim7b9


I support this way of seeing extended harmony

The world would be a happier place if we boiled everything down to component triads and bass notes.
#7
thats not what i was asking.

i was asking, if like in the key of C major, where the chords would be C Dm Em F G Am Bdim

if i were to make them 7th chords, would the progression still be C7 Dm7 Em7 F7 G7 Am7 Bdim7 ???
#8
Quote by Guitar x Dude 7
thats not what i was asking.

i was asking, if like in the key of C major, where the chords would be C Dm Em F G Am Bdim

if i were to make them 7th chords, would the progression still be C7 Dm7 Em7 F7 G7 Am7 Bdim7 ???


Almost.

Cmaj7
Fmaj7
Bmin7b5 (B halfdimished 7th)