#1
I bought Jamie Andreas' "The Principles Of Correct Practise For Guitar" months ago because a lot of people here recommended, but I had trouble implementing it into my practising routine.
One of the main reasons was that it's aimed at Classical guitar, so there's a lot I don't care about (using your right hand in classical position, etc.).
Any ideas?
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#3
Yeah, that's what I'm going to do. I'm trying to read it as much as I can, over and over, until it's drilled into me.
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#4
The classical-related stuff is really only the fingerpicking. That IS more detailed
than the flat picking section, but I think there's plenty of good info on flat picking.
I think the gist of what Jamie is getting to with picking (remember these are BASIC
fundamentals, not everything. It's the foundation on which you'll build all the rest
of your picking) is:

Accurately controlling your pick as it moves from string to string and relaxed,
controlled up pick and down pick through the string are the most important
fundamental techniques to get a handle on. The focus is on elbow control and
refraining from stabilizing your hand on the guitar. Ultimately that will give you
a freer picking style on which to build.

I spent a lot of time "walking" those boxes back and forth, and I'd say it really does
help.

The sub-agenda that permeates the Principles is to open your awareness to things
you may have been unaware of. The Basic Practice Approach is the final goal.
That's the suggested way of approaching practice to any material. You have to
be REALLY disciplined to follow that all the time (I sure don't), but it'll at least
give you a sense of the type of thinking you need to have in order to reach
perfection in your playing.
#5
I tried following The Basic Practise Approach yesterday, and it does seem to work.

What I'm really taking from this book is asking myself the question "what is my body doing wrong?" when something isn't working (and even when it is working). I don't have any of the extreme tension given in some examples, but my right shoulder does creep up a lot, and I think there's something funny going on with my right hand when doing up-strokes.
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